iOS 13 b5 Apple Pay Suica Update

The latest iOS 13 beta Apple Pay Suica has a minor UI tweak that removes the Shinkansen/Green Ticket section added in b4 and, hurray, returns 3D/Haptic Touch notification shortcuts. This was expected as Suica notifications shortcuts have disappeared and reappeared in previous beta cycles. The new Core Haptics version doesn’t feel as nice as the older 3D Touch version on iPhone XS but there is time before the final release. The actual performance of Apple Pay Suica on iOS 13 is on par with iOS 12.3~12.4, a very good thing.

One new interesting tweak is that Suica notifications now appear simultaneously on iPhone and a paired Apple Watch, but I can’t figure out if this is a feature or a bug. The messy low resolution ‘In Transit’ Suica notification artwork is definitely a bug and a placeholder. I hope it’s an indication that dynamic card artwork is coming iOS 13 Wallet after all, even if it’s PassKit NFC Certificate territory that is out of reach to most developers.

And for those Apple Pay Octopus fans out there, sorry but there are no changes from the b4 transit card references when adding cards in a Hong Kong region Wallet.

Apple Pay Suica notification shortcuts have returned in iOS 13 b5
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SmartPlate CEO Takes the Softcream Cashless Index Challenge

AquaBit Spirals CEO Tomohiro Hagiwara responded to my post and took up the Softcream Cashless Index (SCI) challenge, promising to deliver a SCI score of “over 5” with his SmartPlate NFC tag payment service that works with Apple Pay and Google Pay:

The Apple Pay side of SmartPlate depends on the background NFC tag reading capability of iPhone XS and iPhone XR models, and the enhanced Core NFC functionality in iOS 13. The new iPhone models this year with A13 Bionic will undoubtedly build on the A12 Bionic NFC functions introduced in 2018. The big questions are: will Apple Watch Series 5 have NFC background tag reading as part of the Apple Pay experience on a wearable, and what about NFC Tag Apple Pay on non-Bionic chip devices?

watchOS 6 does not support Core NFC, but developers with a PassKit NFC Certificate from Apple can do lots of interesting things with Apple Pay NFC functions. Not that I’m asking Hagiwara san to divulge anything because PassKit NFC Certificates come with all kinds of non-disclosure conditions. But I do look forward to all the Apple Pay goodies coming with iOS 13. So far we have Apple Pay Octopus, Apple Pay Ventra, and Apple Pay myki on the transit side, there will be lots of new stuff on the NFC tag side. It would be great if SmartPlate can join the iOS 13 Apple Pay service rollout with backup from Apple Pay lead Jennifer Bailey at the Apple Event.

I look forward to reporting about the NFC Tag Apple Pay experience, and tasting great softcream along the way.

Sydney Opal expands EMV coverage, next stop: Apple Pay Express Transit

Transport for NSW is expanding open loop EMV bank card support on the Opal transit fare system to include buses next month in addition to implementing Opal fare caps and discounts on bank cards. The agency is encouraging transit users to move away from faster Opal cards (the woman zipping through the transit gate in the video clip 7 second mark is using an Opal card btw) to slower EMV on bank cards and smartphones that reduce in-house card operation expenses.

It’s exactly what Transport for London (TfL) has been doing for years to ween users away from Oyster. Both card fare systems are operated by Cubic, currently none of the Cubic operated transit card systems are natively hosted on Apple Pay, Chicago Ventra will be the first.

With the expansion of EMV support, Sydney should soon be joining the “Where you can use Apple Pay for transit without Express Transit mode” Apple Pay support list, with EMV Express Transit support coming sometime later.

JR West ICOCA Expands Coverage on JR Shikoku

JR West ICOCA extension on JR Shikoku

If you are familiar with the Japan Transit IC card system that started with Suica and grew from there, you might know the other major cards like JR West ICOCA and JR Central Toica. What about the JR Shikoku card? There isn’t one.

The problem dates back to the many bad decisions made by the Nakasone Government when they privatized JNR by breaking off small weak areas like Hokkaido and Shikoku as independent JR companies. It would have been much better if they had used the NTT privatization model of just two companies, East and West, which balance out weak areas with metropolitan hubs.

JR West ICOCA covers a small part of the JR Shikoku rail network already, today they announced an extension covering 7 more stations in March 2020. Even with this extension which is compatible with Apple Pay Suica, Transit IC coverage in Shikoku remains a real headache, one that is hopefully and finally solved by Super Suica in 2021.

File:ICCard Connection en.svg
Japan Transit IC Map, a very cool animated timeline is also available

NFC Tag Apple Pay and Japanese Softcream

Summer is here and the increasing number of Apple Pay Suica inbound tweets are fun to read as always. I saw inbound in action recently at a local station NewDays, 2 Chinese women walked up to the checkout and asked in English “Can we pay here with this?” One was waving a Suica card, the other waving her iPhone. People really appreciate the ease and speed of Suica Express Transit.

However, there are still lots of times on the road when you come face to face with the so called ‘curse of Japanese cash addiction’, and the fact that, even though things have changed a great deal since Apple Pay arrived in Japan, there’s still a long way to go.

I had the that kind of experience recently coming back from Minobu on the Keio Highway Bus. That particular bus has a 10 minute rest break at Shakado Parking Area just outside of Kofu on the Chuo Expressway. There’s barely enough time to dash to the restroom and grab a drink for a long congested crawl to Shinjuku Bus Terminal.

Like many Japanese highway rest areas, Shakado offers delicious looking local specialties. Kofu is a well known for it’s delicious fruits, the Shakado cafeteria softcream fruit parfait looked too good to pass up. With 6 minutes to spare I hunted for the softcream button on the meal ticket machine, which was Suica compatible, but couldn’t find it. I asked one of the staff and they pointed to a separate smaller ticket machine that was just for softcream, a separate stall vendor, and not only was it cash only, it was coin only.

Where’s the softcream button?

Fortunately I had lots of coins that day, a rarity, but pitied another poor westerner wandering around obviously interested in that delicious looking softcream without a clue how to buy one, but I was out of time and dashed for the bus. With a softcream fruit parfait. It was delicious.

After 2 years of writing about cashless/contactless trends, I think I have finally hit on the perfect index for Japan: The Softcream Cashless Index (SCI). Nothing is more regional, seasonal, ubiquitous, cash only and delicious as the endlessly glorious variety of Japanese softcream. Sure, MiniStop has pretty good softcream and all the cashless options like Apple Pay Suica, but those parking area seasonal regionals like Yamagata Cherry softcream (to die for) are always cash cash.

On a scale of 1~10, I put the Japanese national SCI average at 2. Softcream stalls are the worst candidates for the usual cashless options: credit cards/FeliCa/QR etc., because they are mostly one person operations, or side stalls of larger retail operations. Nobody wants to invest in cashless terminals, or even cashless ticket machines, for such mundane, low priced, low margin softcream side business. If softcream can be made cashless, Japan will truly be a cashless nation.

The NFC Tag Apple Pay Option
The ideal cashless payment infrastructure investment for softcream operations is no investment at all. This is why meal ticket machines are so popular in Japan for food serving businesses: they eliminate the cash register all together, the staff can focus on serving customers instead of wasting valuable time babysitting customer payments.

A good cashless payment option in this case is NFC Tag Apple Pay that Jennifer Bailey previewed at her Transact Conference Keynote. A PaymentsSource article covering that keynote makes clear that NFC Tag Apple Pay is built on two iOS 13 technologies: enhanced NFC tag read/write support in Core NFC, and Sign in with Apple ID.

The process leverages “Core NFC,” enabling an iPhone to scan an NFC tag that launches an app or a website, so users can skip the step of downloading an app when accessing a new service, Bailey explained.

“There’s no app requirement and no requirement to pre-sign up,” Bailey said, describing how Bird is using the technology in a pilot, with Apple Pay’s “pay load” automatically working to establish the account information to set up a one-time purchase. “It’s so much easier for new users to get into these services very quickly,”

For NFC Tag Apple Pay to succeed in Japan, it has be offered through major payment providers like J-Mups or Recruit AirPay (who already provide regular terminal based Apple Pay), who can package it together with their cloud backend and an app. From the softcream vendor side, all they need to do is sign up for NFC tag payment service via the setup app and receive a free NFC tag and logo. And that’s it, they are in business.

The concept is similar to the SmartPlate demo only more streamlined. It has to remove all payment involvement from the softcream side, just like a meal ticket machine. The only thing they need to do is look at a screen to confirm payment.

In lieu of Google Pay offering a similar NFC tag payment scheme, the payment provider could conceivably offer an Android app to include that platform but this breaks the Jennifer Bailey rule: no app, no sign-up. This rule is what sets NFC Tag Apple Pay apart from QR Code pay services who want you to sign up in an app to get your personal data. This rule will be the reason for the success of NFC Tag Apple Pay.

Can it change the Softcream Cashless Index? If Apple and their Japanese payment partners can replicate the hands off, no cash register, no brainer experience of Japanese meal ticket machines with NFC Tag Apple Pay, definitely yes. There’s only a year to go until the hot summer Tokyo Olympics but if the SCI average can make it to a 5, or more, that would be a huge tasty success and invitation to eat your way across Japan without a wallet.