On the eve of iOS 13.4

iOS 13.4 GM went out last week with the new iPad Pro/MacBook Air announcements. This week we have another hardware announcement rumor and we have the waiting for Godot Apple Pay Octopus launch…reportedly with iOS 13.4 which should officially arrive March 24~25. I agree with Jason Tjong in that if Apple Pay Octopus is coming, it has to come with iOS 13.4.x, the very last major iOS 13 release. The Apple Pay server leak in June listed iOS 13.0 as the minimum system, I don’t think Apple Pay Octopus will get a reset reprieve for iOS 14. TBC.

Should we worry about the typhoon class headwinds from the corvid-19 crisis blowing apart plans around the world? With everything from the Tokyo Olympics to WWDC up in the air, TBC is all we got.

Timeline

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Special Mobile Suica Maintenance Notice

JR East issued a Mobile Suica system maintenance notice, the downtime will run longer than usual: all services will be offline from midnight to 6:30 am March 21 JST. This includes Apple Pay Suica recharge so be sure to recharge before then, or use cash recharge at the nearest convenience store.

The special maintenance is related to the recent Shinkansen eTicket service launch and preparation for an updated Eki-net App that will eventually support it.

QR Apple Pay Cards for iOS 14 Wallet?

The recent iOS 14 feature leak report from 9to5 Mac closed with an interesting line, “Another change includes AliPay support for Apple Pay with iOS 14.” A reader steered me to a set of screenshot images posted to the Octopus on Apple Pay thread on the LIHKG site.

The screenshot images suggest a few possible scenarios for iOS 14 Wallet:

  • QR Code payment system players have a PassKit API method to add a ‘QR Card’ to Wallet.
  • Wallet QR Cards set as the main card directly invoked with a side button double-click for Face/Touch ID authentication and dynamic QR Code payment generation without an app.
  • Direct static QR Code reads with Apple Pay payment.

It makes sense that Apple wants to encourage major Chinese QR Code players to join the ranks of top tier Wallet cards like any Apple Pay credit card and not be stuck in an app. Direct Apple Pay Wallet QR integration makes things more convenient for iPhone QR Code users. The Wallet card metaphor is rather strange for QR Codes but that is what the Wallet UI is built around and it differentiates cards from passes. Apple already refers to Apple Pay credit/debit cards as ‘Payment Cards’, QR Code cards will be just another Apple Pay Payment card.

Questions: Will it work offline like Wallet NFC cards? Will Wallet QR Code Payment cards require QR Code PassKit Certificates with NDA similar to NFC PassKit Certificates and will they be renamed Secure Element PassKit Certificates? Is this what the new “PKSecureElementPass” PassKit framework addition in iOS 13.4 is for (in addition to CarKey)?

We’ll find out details online this summer at WWDC20.


Update: is this a iOS 13.4 thing? It’s a stretch but an AliPay/Octopus/China T-Union with iOS 13.4 release would be one heck of an Apple Pay party for China.

Update 2: a iOS 13.4 release for March 17 (USA local time/March 18 Asia) sounds about right (tweet below). There’s debate regarding screenshot images being mockups or real…some, none or all. The reader who sent the link said, “These pictures were posted by an OCL employee and are most likely real.” Time will tell. The point of the post is not the images but the concept of a QR ‘card’ and how Apple Pay Wallet can put QR Code payments on equal footing with NFC payments. Take it with a grain of salt😊

JR East Shinkansen eTicket Service Launch

Today, March 14, marks the end of Mobile Suica Shinkansen ticketing in Suica App and the start of a new open IC transit card eTicket Shinkansen service. It doesn’t have name. It’s just one of many ticket options available in the good old JR East ‘Eki-net’ (Station-net) online ticket reservation service, well known and not loved by many. A Japanese friend said it best, “You would think that a top tier Japanese company like JR East with many smart employees would create something better than Eki-net or pay somebody to do so.”

The problem is not that Eki-net doesn’t work. It works, but throwing everything new (IC transit card eTickets) and old (email tickets and paper tickets) in same Eki-net shoebox is a cluttered unwieldy package, a confusing and messy UI not nearly as convenient as JR East wants us to believe. Instead of a sleek new Shinkansen eTicket service, we get the same stodgy paper ticket service with a new hard to find eTicket option.

JR East would have been better off making a clean break by rebranding the new eTickets as a completely different service with a new spiffy name and separate multi-lingual app, just like JR Central’s SmartEX with the addition of new eTicket options over time. The less is more SmartEX approach focuses exclusively on Shinkansen eTickets and eliminates local line travel options because those are covered by Suica/ICOCA/Toica, etc. Eki-net on the other hand makes a big deal of ‘big trip’ options covering everything from Shinkansen and regular express trains to tour packages and car rentals.

The Eki-net approach does have one advantage over the 2-tier JR Central/JR West SmartEX (free membership with small discounts) and EX-Press Reserve (annual membership fee/special IC card/bigger discounts): Eki-net is ‘flat’ with free membership, offering the same discounts to all members in one service. Shinkansen eTickets are only available at launch from the online Eki-net site. I recommend the more streamlined smartphone online browser version. JR East has announced an updated Eki-net App for App Store/Google Play with eTicket support that should be coming March 21 (now postponed to an unknown future date). The new eTicket service is also available to JR West e5489 ticket reservation service members as JR West shares Hokuriku Shinkansen operations with JR East.

The end of Mobile Suica eTickets in Suica App means a mandatory app update that strips out the retired service. Users must update to the new 2.6 version by March 18. After this date older Suica App versions stop working. The migration from the old Mobile Suica Shinkansen eTicket service has good and bad points:

Good Points
JR East Shinkansen eTickets are compatible with all major transit IC cards. This finally opens JR East operated Shinkansen lines to plastic and mobile transit cards, the old system was limited to Mobile Suica. An interesting new twist is that up to 6 transit IC cards can be attached to one account for family or group travel.

Bad Points
The migration from the Mobile Suica Shinkansen/Suica App system means no more Suica App/Apple Pay in-app purchases, you must register an Eki-Net account, yes another JR East service, and a credit card. The current Eki-net system is designed around the account registered credit card for paper ticket pickup at station kiosks using the card PIN code, this effectively eliminates Apple Pay/Google Pay as an in-app purchase choice. Last but not least the new Shinkansen eTicket service is Japanese language only.

New IC/QR gates at JR Takanawa Gateway Station opening March 14

Shinkansen eTickets are only the first step in a long term migration away from mag strip paper tickets. Mag strip ticket gates are more expensive than transit gates with NFC or QR readers with higher maintenance costs, there is also the increasing cost of recycling the special mag strip paper.

Paper tickets for all transit will remain a cash purchase at station kiosks, as they must, these will be QR codes instead of mag strip. The tricky parts are: 1) how much ticketing can be ported over to the transit IC card side 2) what local transit fare tiers apply to QR. Since Shinkansen eTickets are simply one time purchase options attached to a transit IC card number in the cloud, theoretically any purchased option can be attached to a transit IC card number. Local transit has fare tier for cash tickets and a less expensive one for transit IC cards.

I see local transit cash fare tiers staying in place for station kiosk purchased QR paper tickets, but I don’t see smartphone app QR Codes for one time local transit. The cheaper fare tier incentive for reusable transit IC cards will likely remain in place. This leaves smartphone app QR Codes for express trains, limited use tourist/season/campaign passes and group travel.

Mag strip tickets have served us very well for the past 30 years. The final migration to Mobile/NFC/QR will be interesting but I’ll miss those marvelously mechanical ticket gates from Omron.

Mobile PASMO Q&A

What is Mobile PASMO?
Mobile PASMO is an app service, identical to Mobile Suica, for Android v6 Osaifu Keitai devices or later. Users can recharge a virtual PASMO card on the device with a registered credit card, purchase or renew commute plans, view use history, restore the PASMO card from the cloud in case of a lost device, PASMO bus transit users can also earn ‘Bus Toku’ points. Mobile PASMO launched March 18. Details are listed on the Mobile PASMO site (Japanese only).

Is it compatible with Google Pay? (Updated)
Not at this time. Users need to be careful: active Google Pay can block Mobile PASMO transactions. Bank cards are limited to Mobile PASMO app registered credit cards: American Express, JCB, Mastercard, Visa. Credit card registration is processed by PASMO and seems to be the weakest part of the system where users are experiencing the most trouble (the rest of the system appears to be licensed Mobile Suica IT assets). Only Japanese issue cards are accepted.

Is the Mobile PASMO app multi-lingual? (Updated)
Everything is Japanese language only. Android users can download the Mobile PASMO app on Google Play.

Can I use Mobile Suica and Mobile PASMO on the same device? (Updated)
Only 6 recent Osaifu Keitai Type 1 devices support multiple transit card installs. On older Type 2 devices you can only install one and have to choose. As FeliCa Dude explains in his excellent Reddit post, “Mobile PASMO: the “me-too” that’s all about them, and not you” the Mobile FeliCa Android stack on older FeliCa chip devices isn’t like Apple Pay and does not support multiple transit cards or the ability to select one for Express Transit. Type 1 devices updated to Osaifu Ketai 8.2.1 can set one (and only one) ‘main card’ for Express Transit use, with Mobile Suica and Mobile PASMO on the same device. Here is a full device list of Type 1 (Mobile Suica and Mobile PASMO), Type 2 (Mobile Suica or Mobile PASMO), Type 3 (Mobile Suica).

I have a Mobile PASMO capable Type 2 device, which mobile transit service should I use?
It all comes down to commuter pass use, if you live in the Suica/PASMO region and use a JR East line on any part of your commute, Mobile Suica gives you the most options. If you do not use a JR East line as part of your commute, Mobile PASMO is the natural choice.

Will Mobile PASMO be coming to Apple Pay? (Updated)
iOS 13.4 has some indications that Mobile PASMO might be coming at some point. Mobile PASMO uses licensed Mobile Suica assets and technology, the backend is very similar with a different operator. Apple Pay Wallet does have the ability to host multiple transit cards and select one for Express Transit. In theory a user could have a Suica and a PASMO together in Wallet. We’ll have to wait and see if the PASMO group has enough cloud resources to plug into Apple Pay/Google Pay and how willing they are to deal with non-JP issue credit cards.

Isn’t next generation ‘2 cards in 1’ Suica supposed to fix this? (Updated)
Mobile PASMO throws cold water on the one big happy mobile transit family concept of next generation Suica: sharing resources instead of “me too” fiefdoms. Even if the new card architecture fixes all the current shortcomings, which it is supposed to do, nothing can fix the selfish mindset of transit companies who refuse to cooperate. As FeliCa Dude points out, Mobile PASMO is a boondoggle, the result of JR East and PASMO Association failing to cooperate and mutually host commute plans. I suspect that auto-charge transit company premium branded credit cards are getting in the way. Japanese transit companies need to put aside old grudges and cooperate intelligently to get all transit players on mobile as fast as possible. Everybody loses out if they do not.

UPDATE: Japanese programmers digging into Mobile PASMO details find that PASMO licensed Mobile Suica IT assets for Mobile PASMO service. This makes a lot of sense and is an encouraging sign that Mobile Suica cloud resources can be licensed to host other transit IC cards for mobile (ICOCA, TOICA, manaca, etc.).

UPDATE 2: Junya Suzuki posted an article with more Mobile PASMO system details. One leading company in the PASMO Association (Tobu, Keio or Odakyu) licensed Mobile Suica assets and technology from JR East. Cut and paste IT. As said above, this is encouraging because other transit companies (JR West, JR Central et al) can license Mobile Suica assets and park it on whatever cloud service they want: AWS, Azure, NTT Data and so on. Mobile plumbing for connecting Apple Pay and Google Pay is already in place.