JAPAN CASHLESS: Cafe Veloce offers 5% cashless rebates

Finally! A cafe chain with JAPAN CASHLESS rebates and 5% at that. Sayonara Starbucks and hello Cafe Veloce, until July 2020 anyway.

UPDATE: as always some locations are not onboard yet even though Cafe Veloce parent company Chat Noir says they all are. Be sure to check for the CASHLESS logo on the door.

UPDATE 2: confirmed with Chat Noir that all locations are onboard.

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Toyota Wallet: if there must be another Japanese Wallet app, please let it be this

As I have pointed out countless times on this blog, Apple Pay Suica is one of the best Apple Pay services that Apple has hosted on its platform so far. The first transit card on Apple Pay remains the best: it combines the speed of the Suica transit card FeliCa architecture, the convenience of the Mobile Suica cloud, and the flexibility of the Apple Pay recharge backend.

The Apple Pay Suica sandwich: an open flexible recharge backend, sandboxed stored value (i.e. not hot wired to an app account), NFC FeliCa frontend.

This last point is under appreciated. The deal Apple and JR East worked out is the secret sauce: Apple Pay cards in Wallet just work for recharge, from Japan or from abroad, with no extra fees across the board, users earn points for the card of their choice. And users still have the option to recharge with cash if they want to.

A new kind of Wallet app
Toyota Wallet for iOS unveiled on November 19 finally gets right what other QR/Bar Code apps like PayPay have not: a flexible backend matched with a flexible frontend. A version for Android is due in the spring of 2020.

Toyota Wallet is built using the PAYCIERGE platform from TIS. The user has a choice between payment with QR/Bar Code in the Toyota Wallet app with Origami Pay or Bank Pay accounts, or payment with a dual mode EMV/FeliCa iD Mastercard prepaid card in Wallet with the backend recharge hosted from Toyota Wallet.

An interesting side note here is that both PayPay and Line Pay have said that FeliCa cards are a possibility. Up until now this has just been lip service. It would be a welcome development if the Line Pay/Yahoo Japan merger produces a FeliCa payment option similar to what Toyota Wallet has done.

Toyota Wallet is still not open in the way that Apple Pay Suica is. All of the ‘recharge’ methods are in the SMBC orbit, even iD recharge credit cards have to be SMBC issue (such as Docomo dCard) Visa or Mastercard to avoid hefty recharge fees. It’s not perfect and remains chained to the SMBC financial ecosystem, but Toyota Wallet does point a way forward that I hope Toyota Finance Corp. continues to improve, and that other payment system operators follow.

Summary
The Toyota Wallet flexible backend/flexible frontend development is a step forward for digital wallet possibility. This is the first Japanese wallet app where the frontend technology is a simple user choice, not a straitjacket. It shows the innovation possible in Japanese payments market where the focus is on creative thinking. That this kind of innovation comes first on the Apple Pay platform says all you need to know about Apple Pay being open. Compare this approach to the Europe one where the focus is forcing others to solve problems that Europeans should be solving themselves. That approach is a political one, not innovation.

Docomo merging QR payment app functions into iD and Apple Pay

In a classic, ‘isn’t this how it was supposed to work all along?’ fumble, Docomo is finally doing the right thing by merging the ‘rush rush we have a QR Code payment app too’ dHarai app into a rebranded dHarai iD with, eventually, better Apple Pay/Google Pay iD integration. The first step today is the refreshed Android iD add that merges the Android only dMini card into dHarai (iD). An updated iOS dHarai app will be coming later along with other merged functions.

This announcement would have made a much bigger splash a year ago, but with the Line Pay Yahoo Japan merger taking up everybody’s attention now, it feels like Docomo is fixing a mistake in reaction to the merger, which it is not. In the current Japan cashless payments market frenzy, timing and smart execution is everything, just ask 7pay.

Line Pay Pay Pay

Disclaimer 1: As many regular readers know, I am not a QR Code fan. It’s not the technology so much as the assumption that the central processing model and constant network connections solve everything. When I went to Starbucks today I tried paying with the Starbucks app bar code and got a nice little rude reminder that when one link fails, the whole QR/bar code chain crashes. The WiFi at that particular Starbucks store is not robust and ends up jamming the smartphone 4G pipe because the device thinks there is a good WiFi connection. After 2 attempts without getting a bar code load, the staffer said, “turn off the WiFi.” I gave up and used Apple Pay Suica instead. Done.

Disclaimer 2: As many regular readers may not know, I am not a SoftBank fan. This goes back to the time when SoftBank bought Ziff Davis of which the Seybold Report was part of. SoftBank quickly destroyed the Ziff Davis business by sucking it dry and selling off the zombie for a good price before anyone realized it was dead. I wrote for the Seybold Report at the time. What had been a tightly run ship collapsed into chaos because the parent company starved the subsidiary groups and people didn’t get paid. Later on when I wrote reports for Off The Record Research, I regularly visited a Yahoo Japan source who complained that they could not create good iPhone apps because SoftBank constantly sucked the budgets dry. Later on he quietly told me he could not complain anymore because all the conference rooms were wired and everything was recorded. SoftBank is that kind of company. To me all they ever really do is play one big never ending shell game.


There are lots of people excited by the Line Pay/Yahoo Japan merger. IT reporter Junya Suzuki says it’s about creating a ‘Super App’ platform. Bloomberg says it’s about creating a super ‘big data’ platform that sucks up everybody’s everything (and of course nobody discusses where the big data will be stored and processed: will it stay in Japan or be sent to notoriously security lax Korean data centers).

There will be lots of news and discussion in the weeks to follow but it’s important to remember a few essential points.

One: Line Pay and PayPay operations are running in the red, some people estimate PayPay could never turn a profit with its current business model.

Two: neither SoftBank/Yahoo Japan nor NAVER/Line Pay own a real bank. At some point in the cashless payments process, real cash has to change hands. Payment processors without real bank operations have to live with real bank transaction rules and fees, real banks will always have the upper hand. Having a real bank for example, puts Rakuten in a much stronger position than SoftBank. Yahoo Japan does own half of Japan Net Bank but this is a co-venture and Yahoo Japan only runs the internet service side, the other half, the real bank transaction half is owned and run by SMBC. In this arrangement SMBC is calling the shots.

As for me, I have been hanging out on the Girls Channel where Japanese women let down their hair and diss. Japanese women make, or break, products in Japan, especially everything Keitai, not men. Comments on the Line Pay and PayPay merger are very interesting and cutting. They range from “Mercari Pay is disappearing next” to “Hello Rakuten, goodbye Hagebank,” (a diss of bald Masayoshi Son, but also a double entendre for the highly leveraged SoftBank going bust). Day after day it reads like the bloom is off the Line Pay Pay Pay rose and Japanese women who created the first Keitai boom and have money now, are ready to move on. They are in it for the campaigns but not really in it. I’m going to keep hanging out with the girls. It’s a lot more fun and informative than reading the news, and faster too.

Visa Japan signs with Google Pay

Visa Japan finally officially signed with a digital wallet platform and it is Google Pay. As expected it comes with a price: no FeliCa support, no dual mode support, nada, just Visa Contactless that is branded as ‘Visa Touch’ in Japan. The press release outlines recent debit cards from Sony Bank (oh the irony), JapanNet Bank, Resona and Mitsubishi UFJ.

Visa offers dual mode plastic cards that have EMV and FeliCa support in one convenient chip package that work in Japan and abroad. However these new plastic and Google Pay cards are limited to the Visa Touch payment network which is slowly growing in Japan but still full of holes. The most useful payment method for these cards will be the reliable old contact one.

Visa Japan’s long term strategy here is to gradually pull out of the FeliCa based iD and QUICPay contactless payment networks and eventually issue everything on their own Visa Touch payment network. Apple Pay FeliCa support will never sit well with Visa Japan, but now with the Google Pay move we know what Apple Pay has to do to host new Visa card products.

Unfortunately Visa has focused on big marketing pushes like the Tokyo Olympics instead of a consistent and focused drive to build contactless payment support and customer awareness that benefits all players. In a payment market already flooded with payment network logos and acceptance marks, Visa Touch is just one more logo that adds to customer confusion. Visa could have been a leader, instead they gave QR Code players a nice big opportunity, a gift that keeps on giving.