Docomo merging QR payment app functions into iD and Apple Pay

In a classic, ‘isn’t this how it was supposed to work all along?’ fumble, Docomo is finally doing the right thing by merging the ‘rush rush we have a QR Code payment app too’ dHarai app into a rebranded dHarai iD with, eventually, better Apple Pay/Google Pay iD integration. The first step today is the refreshed Android iD add that merges the Android only dMini card into dHarai (iD). An updated iOS dHarai app will be coming later along with other merged functions.

This announcement would have made a much bigger splash a year ago, but with the Line Pay Yahoo Japan merger taking up everybody’s attention now, it feels like Docomo is fixing a mistake in reaction to the merger, which it is not. In the current Japan cashless payments market frenzy, timing and smart execution is everything, just ask 7pay.

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CASHLESS Rebate JRE POINT Pay Day

November 5 was JRE POINT CASHLESS rebate pay day, a grand total of ¥178. Big whup. After a month of using the CASHLESS rebate program, I can say that most of my Suica CASHLESS rebates are the convenience store instant transaction variety that do not use the JRE POINT system. I have also gotten more points out of the JRE POINT yellow logo 2% rebate campaign because I frequent Becks Coffee Shop and NewDays on the daily commute. Most of my cashless rebates are via my plastic Docomo dCard/Mastercard at the local COCOS Nakamura supermarket (the bento selection is real good, as is the fish).

Still, I’m glad to report that the system works as advertised. All the rebate points for October are in. My only wish is for more eligible stores to join the program while the deal lasts.

JAPAN CASHLESS Rebate Month 1: Supermarkets

The JAPAN CASHLESS rebate program has been up and running for a month already and the first batch of Suica JRE POINT rebates should be coming this week. One of the interesting aspects of the program is how it favors smaller family owned businesses with larger 5% rebates to encourage cashless payment uptake on the cash register side. Large chains like AEON and SEIYU (Walmart) are excluded altogether.

Finding a supermarket with CASHLESS rebates isn’t easy but fortunately for Asagaya area residents there is one: CoCoS Nakamura that just opened a store last year. They offer 5% CASHLESS rebates for purchases made with Mastercard and VISA cards, JCB is ‘coming soon’ (no contactless options), there are other CoCoS Nakamura stores in the east part of Tokyo. 5% off everything, effectively the rare 3% ‘jackpot‘ consumption tax rate until June 30 which is nice and a big cashless shopping incentive, I just wish there was more of it lasting longer.

On The Media

Tim has been on a roll recently. Not that Tim, the other Tim. Tim Pool. When YouTube and Twitter started purging ‘conservative’ Japanese content that wasn’t breaking any content rules, following what YouTube and Twitter were already doing in America, Tim Pool was the only online journalist reporting it.

I don’t always agree with Tim’s politics or watch every video post, but I always keep an eye on him. His reports on the devolution of mainstream media and how social media like YouTube and Twitter contribute to that decline, is on the nose. Another thing I like about Tim is that he believes in positive engagement and calling things as he finds it. This sets him apart from former Vice News colleagues: Tim has not lost the ability to think critically and objectively, he questions everything and tries to examine both sides of an issue. To me this is healthy.

And Tim knows when to play the YouTube de-ranking guessing game because he knows there are more important things to report on than waste time fighting YouTube. His milk toast reports are considered so dangerous by YouTube that real YouTube humans review his every video and suppress ones they don’t like:

One disturbing trend that social media drives is what I call cut and paste narrative journalism. Part of it is driven by the need for clicks and what big media thinks will sell. I see this frequently in mainstream western reporting on Japan that likes to portray Japan in a negative light. Here’s a recent piece written by Ian Bremmer for Time titled, Why the Japan-South Korea Trade War Is Worrying for the World, where you can see cut and paste narrative journalism in action.

Why the Japan-South Korea Trade War Is Worrying for the World

The opening sentence is a setup: “but it’s the trade spat between Japan and South Korea that signals the larger troubles ahead for the world.” This is Bremmer’s opinion, nothing else, and puts him squarely in the South Korea supporters club. There are plenty of economic experts who will tell you that Japanese ~ South Korean trade volume isn’t nearly as important as the media makes it out to be.

Skipping the next few sentences of regurgitated South Korean side only history, we arrive at the crucial sentence:

“Frustrated with the proceedings and determined to put pressure on Moon’s government to intervene in some way, Japan strengthened restrictions on several high-tech exports to South Korea in July and downgraded South Korea’s status as a trusted trading partner in August.”

This is classic cut and paste narrative. It substitutes fact for opinion, while presenting it as fact. Bremmer removes all the context of Japanese claims that South Korean was violating UN sanctions on North Korean, among many other things, leading up to the sanctions. Instead of crucial context we get: Japan is frustrated. Really? Can you prove that Ian?

The rest of the piece deflates from there into a half-hearted denouncement of President Trumps foreign policy, without naming Trump, as if Bremmer can’t decide whether it’s a good or bad thing for the U.S. to play the world’s policeman.

I find it hard to stay well informed with big media these days. Big media is still important but sifting the good from the bad is a lot more work. Unfortunately I don’t think it’s going to get easier.

The Future of Cashless Payments is Now

Some people look at Japan and see a crazy mess of cashless payment options: credit cards, iD, QUICPay, Suica, QR Code players like PayPay and Line Pay, all vying for customer wallet space. ‘It’s a shame,’ they say, ‘In our country we have it all worked out with EMV contactless bank cards that do everything.’

I’ve got news for those people, the mess they are seeing in Japan is the future, it just hasn’t come to their country yet. It’s the revolution of payments on smartphones that started with digital wallets like Apple Pay, Google Pay, etc. but it’s sure not ending there, the number of payment options is only going to grow. Get used to it.

The one size fits all thinking of the plastic card era is dead. Some people think it still lives on in digital wallets, but it’s dead. The future belongs to nimble players who mix and match the best payment technologies for the job at hand and offer customers better services along with it.

The so called ‘FeliCa failure’ curse is actually a kind of blessing: the market payment technology fragmentation gave new players a footing to try different payment methods. Diversity isn’t a weakness, it’s a strength. The diversity of Japanese cashless payment options is the result of its longer history of mobile payments.

That is what smart devices, digital wallets and payment apps do: they erode the old ways and bring fragmentation along with new opportunities. There will be cycles of expansion and consolidation but one size fits all will never come back. Call it cutting edge or call it stupid, like it or not, the cashless mess is coming your way.