Twitter Follows YouTube Purge of Conservative Japanese Commentators

First YouTube and now Twitter is freezing mainstream conservative commentators. Kazuya’s bogus YouTube purge for ‘spam’ a few days ago, now reinstated after a overwhelming response from online Japanese across the political spectrum, has been followed by Twitter freezing his account. Two attacks this close together is not coincidence. I smell a rat.

The Twitter takedown is particularly bogus: a ‘well known’ lawyer lodged 4 copyright complaints on a Kazuya tweet that URL links to Kazuya’s own YouTube Channel video. In short somebody claimed copyright on content they don’t own. Twitter froze Kazuya’s account anyway. This is somebody hijacking DMCA rules to take down somebody else they don’t want on Twitter. Maybe Twitter wants it that way.

The YouTube purge has already damaged YouTube’s credibility in Japan because they don’t offer real reasons for banning or reinstating Kazuya’s account or other similar conservative commentator YouTuber accounts that are still frozen. YouTube comes across as being completely arbitrary or worse, politically motivated, a huge turn off for many Japanese.

If Twitter doesn’t do a better job of filtering bogus copyright claims and falls into the trap of becoming somebody else’s tool, Twitter credibility in Japan will be destroyed too.

Your choice Twitter.

UPDATE
Now Twitter has been caught engaging in Shadow Banning of conservative Twitter users but changed it overnight when caught by Vice. Meanwhile Kazuya’s Twitter account still remains frozen for unexplained reasons.

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YouTube Purge Hits Conservative Japanese Channels

The YouTube purge of conservative and right-wing channels as described by Tim Pool earlier this year has hit Japan hard recently with many high-profile and popular channels such as Tsuneyasu Takeda and Kazuya taken down for vague YouTube community violations, spam mostly.

This is not fringe but mainstream commentators who write books, major magazine articles and appear on Japanese TV. Tsuneyasu Takeda is a university professor whose family are descendants from the Meiji Emperor. You cannot get more mainstream than that.

The takedowns are exactly the ‘one strike you’re out purge’ method that Tim Pool describes under the YouTube spam violation policies.

YouTube Spam Policies
Dubious spam violation is a favorite YouTube purge method

Takeda and Kazuya have both setup new YouTube Channels while their cases and uploaded catalog are ‘reviewed’ but subscriber numbers are way down as you’d expect. Pre-purge Kazuya had 490,000 subscribers, now he has 38,000. If YouTube’s intention here is to disrupt Japanese conservative commentators ahead of Japanese Diet elections due later this year, they certainly achieved that.

Regardless of politics I think YouTube’s purge first review later (if ever) action for dubious reasons is deplorable. This has already thrown a chill on Japanese online communities. Japanese take pride in listening to and respecting opinions of others even if they don’t agree with them. I think a lot of younger Japanese, and bloggers will think twice before trusting YouTube, or Google again.

UPDATE
The Japanese response to YouTube’s purge of the Kazuya Channel was so overwhelming that 3 hours after informing Kazuya that the YouTube review of his channel confirmed that it violated YouTube spam policies, without giving any specifics, and would not be reinstated, he received yet another email stating that the YouTube review found his channel did not violate spam policies and was reinstated. Again without offering any details or explanation. Kazuya thanked his followers in a comeback video but observed that YouTube’s actions may have damaged its reputation in Japan.

It already has.

UPDATE
Unfortunately the YouTube purge is spreading to Twitter.

When Your Train Stops

Most rush hour train announcements , the real ones, are mundane. Occasionally they announce a short delay: somebody’s bag got stuck in a door or got sick and needed assistance. The worrisome ones are the emergency stops when somebody hits the platform panic button somewhere. Fortunately most of those clear in a reasonably short time. Then there is the dreaded “Jishin Jiko”, a jumper, a  guarantee your train is going nowhere. December and March are usually the worst times of the year for those cases because that’s when the Yakuza call in delinquent loans.

The acid test of a real Tokyo commuter is how fast you think on your feet the moment a Jishin Jiko announcement comes over the PA system. You know it’s serious when people around you pull out their smartphones and start searching for alternate routes or make phone calls. On the Yamanote line the train crew usually parks at the closest station so people can get off. If you are lucky enough to get a smart train conductor, they offer detailed alternate route information.

When I got stuck on the Yamanote line at Shibuya station once the conductor quickly instructed, “the Yamanote outside (clockwise) loop is running, if you need to get to Ebisu, Meguro or Gotanda stations take the Saikyo line on platform 4 to Ozaki station and double back on the outside loop.” It took a little extra time but I made it to Gotanda station and was on my way.

Another time I was not so lucky, the entire Yamanote line was stopped but the Saikyo line was still running so I took it to Ozaki station. From there I walked to the nearest Tokyu Ikegami line station and was on my way again. 20 minutes lost but no trouble getting to the office in time.

The scariest stoppage was March 11, 2011 when every train and subway in Tokyo stopped running during the massive earthquake. Early the next morning, a Saturday, every train was packed with very tired people who didn’t make a sound as they slowly made their way back home. In the silence you could feel the shock and sadness. In a crush of people on a train you could almost hear a pin drop.