Value Capture and the Ecosystem of Transit Payment Platforms

AppleInsider Daniel Eran Dilger’s very long editorial Apple Services and the ecosystem of value capture has an interesting bit at the beginning:

The term Value Capture applies to rail and transit operators that are given the rights to develop the land around their stations. America’s intercontinental train routes were developed by railroads that were deeded land along their planned rail lines. These plots were then sold off or developed, capturing some of the value added by the fact that that land was adjacent to the transportation service the railroad had built and was operating.

Today, while most of America’s current transit systems (from Amtrak to BART) are now on the brink of failure and are often in worse shape than what you find in third world countries—despite the high tax subsidies paid to sustain them—there are many examples around the world of public and private transit operators performing extremely well simply because they were given the rights to develop the land around their stations, leading to extremely lucrative revenue sources that sustain their operations and growth while they provide efficient transportation services to the public.

Dilger goes on to explain value capture in the App Store ecosystem but misses important transit connections with Apple Pay:

The most successful value capture transit model in the world is the Suica Transit Platform business model on full display at  Tokyo Station. The shopping experience both inside and outside the transit gate is mind-boggling (the Drip Mania coffee softcream is to die for if you can find it) as is the cash flow. If JR East offered business tours in English the waiting lines would look like the lines at Tokyo Comic Con. It’s very strange that other transit agencies around the world, ahem in the west, ignore studying the Suica Transit Platform business model.

Tokyo Station is the Suica card epicenter for transit (regular trains, Shinkansen, buses), shopping, and other services like vending machines and coin lockers. You can buy Shinkansen tickets on the go on your smartphone. Every single store register has a Suica reader and the payment choice is either cash or plastic credit cards but contactless payment is strictly Suica. That is not a problem because Inbound Apple Pay users can join the Suica fun.

There has been a lot of overblown media hand wringing that Japanese contactless payments usage rates are far below what they are in China and Korea, and the Japanese government hopes to raise contactless payment usage rates to 40% by 2025 over the current 20% rate. This “problem” is remarkably easy to fix: create an open shared mobile transit cloud infrastructure that follows the Japanese Transit IC Card Interoperability model. Get the big Japanese transit cards on mobile that unlock the commuter pass and loyalty point goodies associated with the plastic IC cards, and the problem is solved. It’s that simple.

If that cannot be accomplished the Japanese government could talk JR East into hosting everybody else’s transit card on the Mobile Suica cloud with agreeable terms for big and small players. A concept just like the recently released Apple Pay Mizuho Suica. With all the important transit cards on mobile wallet platforms, contactless payment usage rates in Japan would quickly skyrocket beyond 40%. I guarantee it.

 

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MIFARE and Taiwan Transit Coming with iOS 12 Apple Pay?

It’s interesting how different story threads weave together. Taiwan has been running a huge “come visit Taiwan” campaign in Japan the past year or so. Even Mastercard Japan has been in the game highlighting how easy it is for Japanese iPhone users to use Apple Pay when visiting Taiwan. It’s probably the only credit card ad out there that promotes iPhone Apple Pay NFC switching.

I had just run across a Japanese notice put out by the Taiwanese Representative Office in Tokyo announcing that EasyCard and iPass will accept credit card recharge starting in October when a reader contacted me with some interesting NFC switching related EasyCard and iPass tech information: Tokens use FeliCa while IC cards use MIFARE, the NFC chips support both NFC-A and NFC-F as required by NFC certification.

What does it all mean and why is EasyCard and iPass credit card recharge starting in October? The timing certainly fits well with a new Apple iPhone Event but could mean nothing since the announcement is for plastic credit card recharge at a kiosk. From a system standpoint it could mean that Taiwan is getting ready to put EasyCard and iPass on Apple Pay Transit as credit card recharge needs to be in place before hosting a transit card system on a mobile wallet platform.

EasyCard/iPass Apple Pay Transit support requires MIFARE middleware and MIFARE has been a major missing piece so far in Apple Pay. Having that in the iOS 12 official release would open up Apple Pay Transit for native EasyCard and iPass card support. Support for MIFARE transit card systems in Korea, UK, Australia and North America would also be possible but requires the cooperation of local transit operators.

Apple Pay support of EasyCard and iPass would be great not only for iPhone users in Taiwan but a boon for inbound visitors too just like it is for inbound Apple Pay Suica users.

 

Where will the SE be in Pixel 3?

The Google Pay Japan release was very interesting. Nobody expected Google to ditch HCE-F and simply put an new candy wrapper around the tired UI of the reliable Osaifu Keitai Mobile FeliCa standard that has been around since the dawn of mobile payments. Everybody complained but didn’t bother to ask the essential question: why would Google ditch their own Android API unless they have plans for something else.

Now that Android 9 Pie with Google’s take of the Open Mobile API for NFC payments is going out to all Pixel users, what’s in store for embedded secure elements and Google Pay? Google says that

Android 9 adds an implementation of the GlobalPlatform Open Mobile API to Android. On supported devices, apps can use the OMAPI API to access secure elements (SE) to enable smart card payments and other secure services. A hardware abstraction layer (HAL) provides the underlying API for enumerating the variety of secure elements (eSE, UICC, and others) available.

A variety of SE? For who? For Android OEM’s probably but not Pixel. HCE-F is dead so one assumes the SE on the cloud approach for Google Pixel is probably dead too. We can also assume that the SE on the SIM approach is dead. This leaves eSE on the chip for Google Pixel going forward. If Google is investing in their own IC it makes sense to have their own eSE and implement all the middleware on it (EMV, FeliCa, etc.), just like Apple. In other words will Pixel 3 be Global FeliCa without the Osaifu Keitai architecture.

It’s a great way to differentiate Google Pixel hardware from the Android jungle. This way Google Pixel can do real Global FeliCa and more with Google Pay and leave everybody else struggling with Google Pay lite because they don’t have their own custom eSE and middleware solution or don’t want to license Osaifu Keitai for global Android smartphone models.

If Google chooses this path it might work out well for Pixel but the downside is that Android OEM’s will ignore Google Pay and promote their own digital wallet platforms instead. You can’t have cake and eat it too but Google will always try.

What the Hell is VISA Up To in Japan?

VISA is the least consumer friendly card company in Japan. Period. Mastercard, American Express and JCB are making it easy for Japanese customers to use their cards in mobile wallets (Apple Pay, Osaifu Keitai) both domestically and abroad with NFC Switching. NFC certification requires both NFC-A and NFC-F. Smartphones can do it all, how nice.

Except VISA does not want to play nice, they want to play market politics. Witness VISA’s latest boneheaded move reported by Masakazu Tatara on his excellent EPayments JP site: Visa is pulling the plug on Mobile Visa payWave (NFC-A EMV contactless). The last holdout is Sumitomo Mitsui who will terminate service at the end of December 2018. VISA on the iD and QUICPay (NFC-F FeliCa) contactless payment networks remains in place as does plastic card payWave.

As Tatara san asks, what is VISA up to? His quick review of the Mobile VISA payWave spec is helpful and remarkably similar to the Mobile FeliCa spec.

The secure methods for storing Mobile VISA payWave transaction information are:

  1. A mobile device with an Embedded Secure Element (eSE)
  2. HCE (Host Card Emulation in the cloud)
  3. A “Mobile eSE” SWP SIM
  4. A NFC Contactless Payment Sticker

As Tatara san explains, it is the #3 SIM card option that is really being phased out.  #1 includes Apple Pay and Osaifu Keitai devices. The recently released Google Pay Japan is simply an alternative Osaifu Keitai front end that entirely dispenses with the dead HCE-F. As if this was confusing enough, VISA Japan has not signed on with Apple Pay Japan or Google Pay Japan, nor is VISA payWave compatible with the Osaifu Keitai standard. This leaves #2 and #4 as the only real Mobile VISA payWave Japan options going forward. Good luck with that.

Japanese media has speculated that the Sumitomo Mitsu and Mizuho financial groups want to promote QR Code contactless payments over NFC and the death of Mobile VISA payWave proves that QR is winning the contactless payment turf war. Don’t believe it.

In Japan, aka the contactless payment turf war epicenter, the battle line is stored value vs. credit card with stored value cards the clear winner. This week’s Mizuho Suica announcement is proof of that. There isn’t any money for Japanese merchant support of EMV contactless because most inbound tourist business is mainland Chinese who only want to use QR code contactless AliPay and WePay which Japanese will never use.

So where is VISA going in the Japan market? One guess: the success of Apple Pay Suica and the release of the Global FeliCa iPhone/Apple Watch has VISA at a momentary standstill. Because if Google follows Apple’s lead and releases a Global FeliCa Pixel 3 with NFC switching, things will get very interesting. The more Global FeliCa becomes a ho-hum checkbox feature with every smart device, the more VISA Japan will have to play nice with Apple Pay and Google Pay or risk being shoved aside.

Which brings us back to FeliCa again. To outsiders it looks like the Japanese contactless payments market goes round and round, but it doesn’t. VISA Japan goes round and round playing market politics never moving forward, and that does damage. Last month I wrote:

It would be much better for customers if smart device manufacturers bundled all the major middleware stacks (EMV, FeliCa, MIFARE, China Transit, CEPAS) and simply called it Global NFC. Real Global NFC.

Until the industry does a better job of integrating NFC hardware and the various middleware pieces into a virtual whole, NFC confusion will continue to be a problem.

It would be much better for customers if the credit card industry stopped the contactless payment turf wars and started delivering solutions that help customers instead of sowing confusion.

UPDATE: a reader reports says that payWave on SIM cards is pretty much dead everywhere because the “secure element wars are over.” That’s interesting in light of Huawei offering FeliCa Osaifu Keitai service via Docomo with a SIM card. But that is a Docomo thing more than a Huawei thing.

The Big Implications of Apple Pay Mizuho Suica Branding

Apple Pay Branding Model
A diagram of how Mizuho plugs into Suica and how it could work with branding schemes like PASMO

Mizuho Suica for Apple Pay raises questions and fascinating possibilities way beyond yesterday’s announcement. Why now and why only Apple Pay? Is this the first of many Suica branded cards coming to Apple Pay?

The announcement was short, small and caught Japanese IT journalists off guard. Nobody anticipated Apple Pay Suica branding just appearing and working with a wallet app update. It’s slick and in true Apple fashion ‘just works’, but journalists missed important points with huge ramifications:

  • Mizuho Suica only exists as a virtual card hosted on the Mobile Suica Cloud, there is no plastic equivalent
  • DNP provides the Mizuho Wallet app backend

Put together this means the Apple Pay Suica branding vehicle is complete and ready to roll. Almost exactly the model outlined earlier.

The only remaining question is how many other transit companies and banks are going to get on? It’s tempting to think that with another Apple Event approaching, Suica’s eight sisters will join the Apple Pay branding parade: PASMO, ICOCA, TOICA, manaca, Kitaka, SUGOCA, HAYAKAKEN, nimoca. That’s probably a long shot but the vehicle is ready and waiting if they decide to join and time is running out if other transit areas want to benefit from the flood of inbound visitors anticipated for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

The Apple Pay Japan strategy of focusing on the stored value Suica transit card more than credit cards has been a tremendous success. Transit truly is the golden uptake path for contactless payments, exactly as the recent and widely regurgitated Juniper Research piece pointed out but everybody seemed to miss that point.

None of the other Japanese transit cards are on mobile but everybody building their own cloud infrastructure is out of the question. If JR East, DNP and Apple can coax the other Japanese transit cards to join the Suica branding scheme that finally offers commuter plans and more for everywhere and not just Tokyo, Apple Pay will easily become the de facto mobile wallet for Japan.

UPDATE 1: the Apple Pay Suica branding program is underway, sources say ‘stay tuned’ for more Apple Pay Japan payments and apps in the near future, September and October are the usual suspects.

UPDATE 2: I think one reason why Japanese journalists missed the virtual only Mizuho Suica point is because the Android Mizuho Wallet App release earlier this year also had virtual cards with one very important difference. Android Mizuho Wallet creates virtual Mizuho QUICPay JCB Debit cards not Suica. Mizuho Debit cards are hosted on the Mizuho system just like their credit cards. Virtual Suica branded cards are hosted on the JR East Mobile Suica Cloud, a completely different system with completely different implications.

UPDATE 3: I hate the blog title and am utterly clueless trying to find a better one that exactly captures why this is an important development.