iPhone SE too popular in Japan?

Yes, as crazy as that sounds, but according to Kenta Yamaguchi’s piece on ASCII that’s exactly what is happening. The point of his story is that starting today, second brand carriers Y! mobile and UQ Mobile are selling iPhone SE instead of iPhone 8. Until yesterday they only offered the budget Apple Pay Suica capable iPhone 7 and normally they would offer iPhone 8, but iPhone 8 is nowhere to be seen in the budget lineup. Instead they are offering iPhone SE only 4 months after it went on sale at first tier carriers.

The big loser here is Rakuten Mobile who do not offer iPhone SE. Apple fully understands the ‘Face ID sucks in the face mask COVID era’ market opportunity, aka unfortunate success, that is the A13 Touch ID powered iPhone SE. Apple also wants many background NFC tag reading capable iPhones out there for iOS 14 App clips, so iPhone SE is going on sale everywhere.

Yamaguchi san says the SE is so popular that major carriers are bitching it will slowdown the 5G migration in Japan…while still selling as many iPhone SE units as they can. 5G will just have to wait until Apple comes up with a budget 5G Touch ID iPhone SE.

Suica UI tweaks in iOS 14/watchOS 7

As with every major iOS update the Apple Pay Suica UI gets a minor tweak or two. Sometimes they pan out, sometimes they don’t. The dynamic commute plan ‘Renew’ button was a little more descriptive in b4 and b5. At best it’s was of questionable value when the language was Japanese but downright embarrassing to look at when the language was English.

Since Wallet card UI elements can be dynamic why not highlight the expiration date in red instead? Apple engineers fortunately had the better sense to change the button label back to the sensible iOS 13 design in iOS 14 b6, the final design.

watchOS 7 Suica is getting some useful tweaks: card transaction history, low balance and commute plan renewal reminders, and Suica card information can now be viewed and/or set directly on Apple Watch. In watchOS 6 these can only be viewed or set in iOS Watch App.

Hama Pay adds dual NFC/QR as iOS 14 Apple Pay QR payments loom

The recent Bank of Yokohama Hama Pay app update created some buzz with the addition of an Apple Pay iD Prepaid card option. It’s similar to the Toyota Wallet approach: the bank app links the user’s bank account to an open front end bank payment service with QR code payment for debit and credit and NFC payment for prepaid.

The difference with the Hama Pay prepaid card is that VISA JP issues the iD card which means it cannot be used internationally the same way that the Toyota Wallet Mastercard iD card can; Mastercard supports iOS NFC switching, VISA JP does not.

Another weird thing: the Hama Pay ad blurb uses the ‘Touch Payment’ branding phrase with iD. Up until now VISA JP reserved that exclusively for EMV contactless card issue but not for FeliCa cards, which of course iD is. Does this mean VISA JP will finally sign with Apple Pay? Probably not.

The Toyota Wallet also uses a QR+NFC frontend

IT journalists approach the story as a NFC vs QR dilemma for banks, but I don’t think this captures the whole story. iOS 14 Apple Pay is adding QR code payments for the first time and this means that QR Code Wallet payments don’t need to launch an app, they will work directly from the lock screen just like any Apple Pay card.

This represents a big evolution of Apple Pay from NFC only to an open front end approach that includes NFC, Code payments and Ultra Wideband. It will be very interesting to see how bank apps evolve in the iOS 14 era as we move away from the plastic era ‘A vs B’ mind set to the bewildering variety of ‘A~Z take your pick’ era of mobile payments. We still have the Apple Pay/Face ID with face mask passcode nonsense…but that’s another post for another day.

iOS 14 Apple Pay is adding Ultra Wideband and QR into the mix

Kuyo: the importance of remembering and forgetting

The Japanese Kanji and meaning for Kuyo (供養), apparently has no real direct equivalent in Chinese; I occasionally run across online questions from mainland Chinese exchange students in Japan asking what it means. The standard English translation, ‘memorial’, is worthless and does almost nothing to convey what Kuyo really is.

Kuyo is praying for the spirit of the deceased to be nourished by our earthly efforts so they attain enlightenment. In this way Kuyo is closer to the original ancient Indian Buddhist ceremonies and also elements of Vietnamese Buddhism which suggests that the culture traveled the southern trade routes to Japan.

In traditional Japanese Buddhism the 50th memorial year was the usual cutoff up through the Showa era, but these days the cutoff is the 33rd memorial since most of the people directly connected with the deceased aren’t around to do Kuyo for them, and it’s not the responsibility for later generations.

Japanese Buddhist practitioners say that forgetting is just as important in Kuyo as remembering. That sounds like a contradiction but it’s part of letting go of the past even as one honors it with Kuyo prayers; an important natural progression not only for the living, but also for the spirits of the deceased to leave past lives and become enlightened.

2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the end of the Pacific War. The annual Kuyo ceremony for all victims of the war and prayer for world peace was held on August 15 at the Chidorigafuchi National Cemetery. This years event was drastically scaled down because of COVID but I see it staying small as the number of people with direct connections with the war dwindles away.

When it disappears entirely I hope people will remember to forget, in the right way. I don’t believe that the people of the war generation wanted Kuyo to go on forever or burden future generations with the responsibility. They wanted them to be free from the past and lead happy lives, because that is the ultimate goal of Kuyo: happiness and enlightenment for all beings of the past, present and future.

Apple Pay monopoly, are we really comparing “Apples” with “Apples”?

Ruimin Yang has written a wonderfully detailed and thoughtful post, “Apple Pay monopoly, are we really comparing ‘Apples’ with ‘Apples?“, that outlines the entire Apple Pay system architecture, how it compares to other digital wallet platforms, (Google Pay, Samsung Pay) and what ‘open vs closed’ means in whole ‘Apple Pay is a monopoly’ debate. Worth your time if you have any interest in digital payments. It’s the kind of piece that I wish I had the discipline and chops to write but don’t; I’m not the expert Ruimin Yang kindly makes me out to be.

The short take: it’s easier to examine the issues as business model politics. Mobile payments and digital wallets have disrupted everything and traditional players, banks and card companies i.e. the real gatekeepers, are doing everything they can to keep the upper hand.