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Migrate Apple Pay Suica to new iPhone or Apple Watch

Apple Pay Suica is different from Apple Pay credit cards in that Suica stored value is stored locally on the device and can only exist on a single device. Apple Pay credit cards can coexist simultaneously on iPhone and Apple Watch, not so with Suica.

The Suica Two Step
To migrate Suica to a new iPhone or Apple Watch you must do two things:

  • Remove Suica from Wallet on the old device: On the old device go to Wallet> tap Suica > tap ˚˚˚ in the upper right corner> scroll to the bottom>tap Remove This Card. Don’t worry, Apple Pay automatically migrates Suica to Apple Pay iCloud and safely stores it for you.
  • Add Suica to the new device: on the new device make sure you are signed in with the same Apple ID, open Wallet, tap “+”, tap Suica, add your Suica.
  • Transfer Suica from Apple Watch to iPhone and back again: Here is another two step if you are only upgrading Apple Watch and keeping the same iPhone. Simply transfer Suica from Apple Watch Wallet to iPhone Wallet with the Watch app before unpairing Apple Watch. After the new Apple Watch is paired, transfer Suica back from iPhone to Apple Watch.

Don’t worry about losing your Suica SF account balance or commute plan information. Apple Pay iCloud and the Mobile Suica preserve all of your Suica information. Just make sure that you are signed in with the same Apple ID on your new iPhone and that Apple Pay is turned on. If the add Suica option does not show in Wallet, set the device Region to Japan, re-add Suica, then return Region to your preference.

If the Suica ID Number changes
JR East Mobile Suica support says that Suica card ID numbers may change when removed and re-added to Wallet. Soft-linked Apple Pay Suica services like EX App (smartEX and Express Reservation), Touch and Go Shinkansen and JR East Eki-net Shinkansen eTickets stop working when the Suica ID number changes. If the Suica ID number changes users have to manually update the registration information to re-link services with the new Suica ID.

If you wipe the old device, or forget to delete Suica on the old device before setting up the new one and cannot find your previous Suica, see Recover Suica from a lost or wiped iPhone. Other topics can be found on the Apple Pay Suica Guide.

Pixel 4 FeliCa outside of Japan hiding in plain sight (Updated)

After posting about the global NFC possibility of Pixel 5 and Fitbit, a reader forwarded some interesting Pixel 4 FeliCa information. We all know the official story that FeliCa only works in the Japanese Pixel 4 SKUs and no other models. However, there are indications that Google installed FeliCa capable hardware in all Pixel 4 models worldwide all this time but only enables the Japanese SKUs.

The reader asked me to post some information so that we can find out the truth with help from other readers of this blog. We are looking for non-JP Pixel 4/4a SKU users who can tag read their Pixel 4/4a device with another Android device loaded with the NXP NFC TagInfo app downloaded from Google Play. The steps to do this:

(1) Install the TagInfo app, turn off NFC-A and NFC-B reads as we only want to read NFC-F tags (see screenshot directly below)
(2) Tag read the Pixel 4/4a with the TagInfo installed Android device
(3) Take a screenshot of the NFC scan results #1
(4) Tag read the Pixel 4/4a a second time, take a screenshot of scan results #2

Read #1 (Before Enablement): If FeliCa is present the Primary System Code in the Detailed protocol information section should be 0xFFFF. Additionally, Mobile FeliCa 4.1 will show a pre-enablement IDm starting with 05:FE.

Read #2 (After Enablement): On a JP Pixel 4 shown in the screenshot below, the Common Area (0xFE00) will be present, and the Primary System Code will have changed to 0xFE00, that of the Common Area. On non-JP models enablement doesn’t happen, read #2 will match read #1.

Enablement means running the Osaifu Keitai app. Let me know by Twitter @Kanjo or email the following:

(1) The Pixel 4/4a model
(2) If the read #1 result indicates FeliCa with System Code OxFFFF and if it changes in the #2
(3) If the first 4 digits of the IDm begin with 05:FE in read #1

What does it mean if all Pixel 4/4a models have FeliCa, does it change anything? It simply means that FeliCa is loaded and present in all Pixel 4/4a devices but Google only turns it on for Japanese models. This doesn’t change anything in the short term. The real value is that it helps us understand what Google is up to and possible changes that might be coming later on with Pixel 5: i.e. global NFC just like Apple.


UPDATE

A few readers shared results and they all indicate Mobile FeliCa 4.1 is present with all SKUs matching the Japanese model ‘before entitlement’ state. Mobile FeliCa is ready but entitlement step does not occur: the Osaifu Keitai app does not load and run.

This would explain reports of a Pixel 4 user rooting a USA SKU device, changing some parameters and running Osaifu Keitai.

Dear Jane, we fucked up, sincerely MTA

The piecemeal MTA OMNY rollout is a lesson how not to do a transition from old system to new system. A case where poor design, poor management choices and unanticipated user interaction, each insignificant in isolation, snowball into a nagging long term problem.

The problem goes like this:

(1) Apple Pay Express Transit is opted in by default and iPhone users don’t always know it’s on. They don’t care about using Apple Pay credit cards on OMNY anyway because fare options are limited and OMNY isn’t installed everywhere and won’t be until at least the end of next year. They use good old MetroCard and put iPhone away in the right pocket or purse carried on the right shoulder.

(2) When the user gets to a OMNY fare gate they swipe MetroCard with its peculiar forward swipe motion on the reader which is located above and behind the OMNY NFC reader, which is positioned low and angled at pocket level. As “MetroCard sucks, it may take several (forward) swipes to enter”, the user leans into the gate while doing this and boom: OMNY reader activates iPhone Express Transit and charges fare without the user knowing it.

Default opt in Express Transit has been with us ever since Apple Pay Suica arrived in 2016. But transit cards are not credit cards and everything was fine. Things got sticky when iOS 12.3 introduced EMV Express Transit that uses bank issued credit/debit/prepaid cards for transit on Apple certified open loop systems. Currently these are Portland HOP, NYC OMNY and London TfL.

HOP and TfL don’t have problems with Express Transit. Both systems use contactless exclusively. HOP has stand alone validators, not gates. TfL gates have the NFC reader located on the top. OMNY on the other hand will have MetroCard swipe cards around for years to come: the OMNY transit card replacement is still in development with no release date. With the slow transition pace and current gate design expect the OMNY Express Transit problem to be around until MetroCard is dead, and OMNY is complete with the new tap only card.

In retrospect MTA should have done it this way: (1) rollout out the OMNY card MetroCard replacement first and add open loop support as the very last thing, (2) design better OMNY gates in two kinds, dual mode NFC + swipe, and single mode NFC only. This way MTA stations could do what JR East stations do: start with single mode tap only express gates on the edges and dual mode gates in the middle. As the transition progresses the dual mode gates get fewer and pushed to the sides with single mode gates taking over.

Apple could help by keeping automatic Express Transit opt in only for native transit cards (Suica, SmarTrip etc.). EMV Express Transit should always be a manual opt in. I understand Apple’s perspective: they want to present Apple Pay Express Transit as a seamless one flavor service, not good/better/best Express Transit flavors. The reality however is that the current technology powering EMV open loop fare systems isn’t up to native transit card standards. Apple can’t fix that.

Unfortunately MTA has taken the dumb path of blaming Apple instead of fixing their own problems. New York deserves a world class modern transit system, OMNY is an important step in building one. MTA management performance so far doesn’t inspire much confidence. Let’s hope they focus on the rollout and deliver it without more delays or problems.


Are Google Pixel 5 and Fitbit up to the Global NFC Challenge?

It’s that time of year again to think about FeliCa support on the Google Pixel platform as Pixel 5 approaches. Ever since Pixel 3 things have been the stuck in a rut: the same global NFC (A-B-F) chip is used in all models but only FeliCa keys for card emulation are installed on Japanese models, i.e., no Suica for you if you don’t have one of those.

I used to think that Google was going cheap instead of deep. Google is cheap here actually, and lazy, but there are some other reasons. It goes back to the problem many people had with Google Pay Japan FeliCa support to begin with: it’s only a UI candy coating on top of the aging Osaifu Keitai stack and apps. Instead of doing a true top to bottom Google Pay global NFC solution like Apple did, Google Pay Japan FeliCa support is just surfing on the Osaifu Keitai board. And of course the Android Pay HCE-F thing is long since dead, it’s eSE or nothing now.

The real problem is this: Osaifu Keitai is a domestic platform, Osaifu Keitai apps (Suica, etc.) are domestic apps. The various Osaifu Keitai partners and developers don’t want to deal with the extra expense of multi-lingual localization and support. But neither does Google, hence the logjam.

Google’s recent purchase of Fitbit might be the agent of change that finally breaks the jam. The Osaifu Keitai model doesn’t extend to wearables. Google Pay has to come up with something new to replace Fitbit Pay, something that works across paired devices seamlessly if Google Pay Suica is to exist on a Fitbit smartwatch paired with Pixel.

There is something new this time around that didn’t exist, or at least didn’t exist as a developer product back in 2018: Mobile FeliCa Platform and Mobile FeliCa Cloud for supporting all kinds of Mobile FeliCa services worldwide. I’m sure this arrangement got Suica on Garmin Pay.

Taken together I think there is a better chance Google will go deep instead of cheap, hopefully sooner than later. Google Pay Suica and Google Pay PASMO on Pixel and Fitbit devices from anywhere would be a very welcome development.

LINE Pay for Apple Pay

LINE Pay said years ago they would add NFC/FeliCa support if customers wanted it. Now that Apple Pay is gaining QR Code Payment support in iOS 14, LINE Pay announced Apple Pay support ‘in 2020‘ at the online LINE DAY 2020 (2:34:00 mark) media event today. The announcement has special meaning as LINE is the first QR Code payment player to announce Apple Pay support and did so before AliPay.

The timing makes sense now that iOS 14 is nearing official release, but Apple has not officially announced Apple Pay Code Payments yet though they may reveal something at the online September 15 Apple Event. Things will be damn awkward if they don’t.

There are lots of questions: will LINE Pay Apple Pay be a NFC/FeliCa + QR Code Payment in one Wallet ‘card’, or will it be the Apple Pay flavor of the Line Pay JCB prepaid card already on Google Pay that works on the FeliCa QUICPay network.

LINE Pay implied the intention of leveraging Apple Pay Code Payments and NFC but there isn’t much to go by at this point, except that LINE said Apple Pay will ‘complete the LINE PAY contactless payment platform.’ Whatever that means.

Now that LINE has made their Apple Pay move, PayPay is sure to follow. The trend to offer flexible NFC + QR payment solutions started with Toyota Wallet and will surely gain momentum with iOS 14 Apple Pay, especially with App Clips.

Smells like Super Suica: Sony unveils next generation FeliCa

Sony announced the next generation FeliCa chip on September 8. Next generation FeliCa was mentioned in the September 2018 next generation Suica, aka Super Suica, press release. This is the first glimpse into some of the new FeliCa features that Super Suica will use. The Japanese and English press released highlight different feature sets. A basic rundown:

  • Additional Security Options: state of the art encryption, integrity protection option for ‘cost-balanced system solution use cases where higher priority is given to high-speed transactions while meeting the required security needs’. The new chip also complies with Public Transportation IC Card Protection Profile (PTPP).
  • Extended Overlap Service: different service providers can share additional services, while making the most of existing systems.
  • Value-Limited Purse Service: purse data can be set as a negative numerical value, and enables “Upper Limit Value” and “Lower Limit Value” to be specified.
  • FeliCa Secure ID: on the surface this cloud based service sounds exactly like the digital car key feature Sony and NTT Docomo demoed at the Docomo Open House back in January and exactly like Apple Pay Car Key sharing. Dare I say there seems to be more web service functionality that might relate to the NFC Tag Maas Suica hinted at by AquaBit Spirals CEO Tomohiro Hagiwara.

The new hardware chip is NFC Forum Type 3 Tag compliant and works with NFC Forum certified devices.

As I explained previously, one big aim of Super Suica is sharing resources and services to reduce costs. Right off the bat Extended Overlap Service looks exactly what Super Suica wants to do: host other transit company commuter passes and reward points. The new FeliCa Japanese press release graph illustrates this, it almost looks like dual mode services in a single mode card. I think Super Suica is going to leverage the shit out of it.

Another interesting feature is the Value-Limited Purse Service. Super Suica will certainly get a stored value purse upgrade from the current ¥20,000 limit. I’m curious to find out if next generation Suica uses the new feature for additional stored value services.

One big question is when does FeliCa Networks upgrade Mobile FeliCa with all these new features and when do licensed developers get the goods. Sony and NTT Docomo already demoed Android Osaifu Keitai smartphones using FeliCa Secure ID and digital car keys with Ultra Wideband ‘Touchless’ in January. I think it’s safe to assume licensees get new FeliCa chips and upgraded Mobile FeliCa at the same time.

This is just a cursory overview. I have fingers crossed that FeliCa Dude will post something to Reddit that will delight and enlighten us when he has the time. In the meantime we have Apple Pay PASMO coming down the pike very soon in what I hope is a preview of more to come in 2021.