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Apple Pay Suica • PASMO Basic Troubleshooting

Notice: Apple Pay recharge in Wallet app with foreign issue VISA credit cards stopped working Friday, August 5 JST. The issue is ongoing, use Mastercard or AMEX cards for adding money to Apple Pay Suica and PASMO. Recharge for the major card brands as follows:

  • Non-JP issue VISA credit cards: Suica NG / PASMO NG, some VISA debit cards are working
  • Non-JP issue Mastercard cards: Suica OK / PASMO OK
  • Non-JP issue Amex cards: Suica OK / PASMO OK

Mobile PASMO / Mobile Suica support both say non-JP issue cards are officially supported for Wallet app recharge and there should be no problem. Their official line is ‘contact your card issuer’. If you contact your card issuer they will tell you there should be no problem and to ‘contact the merchant’.

There are many links in the payments processing chain: Apple Pay, online merchants like Mobile Suica, merchant acquirer, payment processor, VISA, etc. It appears that VISA made security changes on the backend that affect non-JP issue VISA cards for select online payments including some types of Apple Pay (and Google Pay) in-app purchases, in this case Suica and PASMO recharge. However it’s not clear where the issue lays, the context of rampant phishing attacks on many JP online services such as Mobile Suica early this year could be part of the reason. (Last updated 2022-09-30 JST)


Intro
Basic Q&A troubleshooting issues are covered on the JR East Suica Apple Pay English language support page and the PASMO Apple Pay English language support page. Common issues are explained below in more detail and include Suica App or PASMO App use to resolve issues not covered in the official but limited, English language support pages. Make sure you perform troubleshooting outside of the Mobile Suica • PASMO 2 am ~ 4 am JST nightly service maintenance downtime window.


The vast majority of Apple Pay Suica•PASMO issues boil down to poor network connection issues, usually when using free WiFi, auto-connect carrier WiFi, or in crowded areas with maxed out mobile connectivity. Always make sure your device has a robust internet connection when recharging in Wallet or using Suica or PASMO apps.

Poor network connection causes an error
When adding / transferring / recharging a Suica•PASMO card with a poor network connection, Wallet appears to hang during the process. Suica•PASMO App may show a ‘H017’ or ‘C102’ error.

One important thing to remember about recharge: if you see multiple failed charges on your credit or debit card, these are temporary charges that are not processed and automatically removed with 24 hours during the nightly system maintenance period.

When Apple Pay Suica•PASMO Recharge fails or hangs, don’t panic. Cancel the recharge process by hitting the sleep button, then check to make sure iPhone has a robust network connection, turn off WiFi and use 4G • 5G, sometimes it helps to toggle Airplane Mode on and off to clear a bad connection. When you have a robust connection try recharge again. If recharge still fails Suica App or PASMO App may display an error numbers.

In all error cases do the following:

  1. Restart iPhone.
  2. Make sure your iPhone has a robust internet connection.
  3. Make sure you are not in the Mobile Suica / Mobile PASMO 2 am~4 am JST maintenance window.
  4. Open Suica App or PASMO App (you do not need a registered account for this operation)
  5. Tap the red explanation mark if you see one on the card, then tap ‘OK’

This operation will clear most error problems, if it does not clear the problem do the next steps:

  • Confirm that you are logged into the same Apple ID used to add Suica•PASMO
  • Open Wallet > select Suica or PASMO > tap the more button ‘…’ > scroll to the bottom of the card > tap ‘Remove this card’.
  • Wait 5 minutes.
  • Tap add card ‘+’ in Wallet, tap Previous Cards in Add to Wallet screen
  • You should see your Suica or PASMO in the Previous Cards screen, tap Continue.
  • In Add Card the Suica or PASMO you removed from Wallet should be showing with the balance, tap Next to complete.

When the card remove operation appears hung
If the Suica•PASMO card deletes from Wallet but appears hung as “Deleting” in the iCloud device list, sign out of Apple ID on your iPhone, restart the device, then login with the same Apple ID.

Card Unavailable Message
In some cases you may get a Card Unavailable screen when attempting to re-add Suica•PASMO in Wallet:

This means there are some issues that the Mobile Suica / Mobile PASMO systems will clear during the maintenance period. Simply wait for the end of the next 2 am~4 am JST maintenance window, then re-add the card.

**Troubleshooting notice for Apple Pay Commuter Suica users: Suica App 3.0 introduced a new process when re-adding Commuter Suica cards. There are cases when re-adding a Commuter Suica to Wallet the stored fare balance will be 0. Don’t panic if this happens, your stored fare balance is not lost. This is done so that commuter passes can be re-added and used immediately even if there are remaining stored fare issues to fix during the Mobile Suica nightly maintenance reset. The previous stored fare balance is restored manually via the Suica Pocket option in Suica App and will show up as a Suica App notification.


Trouble transferring plastic Suica•PASMO to Wallet
If you have problems transferring a plastic Suica•PASMO card to Wallet there are documented tips on the Apple Support page If you can’t transfer Suica or PASMO cards to your iPhone or Apple Watch in the “Try to add a Suica•PASMO card” section. These are reproduced below with some extra notes.

  1. Your birthdate is required only if you’re trying to add a My Suica or Commuter Suica card to Apple Pay. Use the same date of birth that you entered when you purchased your plastic Suica card.
    The three basic Suica card varieties are: Unregistered, My Suica and Commuter. As noted in the Apple page when you transfer plastic My Suica or Commuter cards to Apple Pay you need to enter date of birth. But there are card naming restrictions to be aware of:
    • My Suica, personalized PASMO, or Commuter Suica and PASMO cards that use romaji names or international phone numbers are not supported by Apple Pay.

      The best thing to do if your iPhone cannot transfer plastic Suica•PASMO to Apple Pay is to take your plastic card the nearest JR station or PASMO member station and tell the station attendant that you want to re-issue your card with a katakana name. This is also the thing to do if your plastic Suica card is a very old Suica format that iPhone cannot read. Re-issue of a plastic Suica•PASMO at the station is free.
  2. If you are trying to add a second Suica or PASMO card to use with Apple Pay, make sure the name on the second card matches the first name on your My Suica, or Commuter Suica or PASMO card. If you have different names on multiple cards, download and register in Suica or PASMO App. (Card names can be changed to any preference in Suica or PASMO App)

  3. Make sure that your plastic card is resting on a flat non-metallic surface. Rest the top of your iPhone on the middle of the card. Keep it there until the transfer completes, which can take up to a minute. It might also help to hold your card and iPhone in your hand. (Non-metallic is the keyword here)
  4. Make sure that the value on your Suica or PASMO card doesn’t exceed 19500 Yen. (The card SF balance limit is ¥20,000)
  5. You can add a combo credit card + Suica•PASMO card by tapping Credit or Prepaid Card in Wallet. Only the credit card will be added to Apple Pay. The Suica•PASMO card cannot be added, and the balance of the card remains on the plastic combo card.
  6. Certain Suica and PASMO cards (like Student Commuter Suica cards) might need to be verified before you can add them to Apple Pay. For additional functionality of Suica or PASMO cards in the Wallet app, download and register within the Suica app or PASMO app on your iPhone.

    Be aware that Suica App / PASMO App are Japanese language only. Go to my Suica App • PASMO App Guide for English language help. Student Commuter cards are complicated because Apple Pay Commuter Suica•PASMO purchase and renewal requires a credit card and 18 is legal age for credit cards. Students can work around the no-credit card problem with using a Line pre-paid card registered in Suica App / PASMO App. The student verification process is explained in Japanese here.

The JRE POINT Reboot

The JRE POINT website and apps (iOS•Android) received a makeover on August 29. The purpose of the reboot was to increase security with Face/Touch ID login, and add some long overdue features such as removing the single Mobile Suica registration limit. With the new service, account users can register up to 20 Suica cards of any type and also share JRE POINT with other JRE POINT ‘family’ member accounts.

As with all JR East online services that get a reboot, things did not go very well. The first 48 hours were full of glitches and the app basically did not work for many people. After a few update patches things are working for the most part, the JRE POINT iOS app is currently 3.0.4 but still needs some fixes as auto login only works half the time. By far the best new features are the ability to add more than one Mobile Suica card, handy for families, as well as point sharing although it’s rather cumbersome.

From a UI perspective, JRE POINT app is very similar to Eki-Net in that the UI jettisons native iOS and Android controls for a clumsy web UI. The only reason for using the app instead of the web site is to use the JRE POINT barcode at checkout and play the stupid little games for extra JRE POINT. The Face/Touch ID login support is less appealing than you might expect, it’s only used in lieu of the 6 PIN code to access point transaction history, or change login ID and password.

I’ve updated the JRE POINT guide for the new features and UI. Let me know if you find anything missing.

Mt. Minobu Trail Run finally returns

After a long absence due to COVID restrictions and typhoon damage to trails and access roads, the Mt. Minobu Monk’s Run Trail Race is taking place Sunday, November 27. This is the first time in several years that the full 36 kilometer course over Mt. Minobu and Mt. Shichimen is open for competition. See the Japanese web site for details. Here are 2 article posts covering the event:

Monk’s Run
Monk’s Run revisited

Riding the rails with AirPods Pro 2

The original AirPods were a godsend for morning rush hour commuting on the super crowded Yamanote line in Tokyo. The sound quality was not all that different from the wired EarPods that came with iPhone, but they were wireless and that was a game changer. There were countless times when my EarPods cable would catch on a woman’s bag squeezing past in a rush for the car doors, with EarPods and iPhone suddenly ripped out of my ears and pocket, either falling to the floor, or most embarrassing of all, trailing behind a running person while I scrambled to catch them. AirPods eliminated that problem and physical cable noises too, more than enough to put up with the familiar EarPod issues of not staying in the ear so well, or cleaning ear wax buildup on the inside mesh.

Then came AirPods Pro and the magic of noise cancellation, transparency mode and earphones that fit snuggly, so comfortable I’d forget I was wearing them. AirPods Pro 1 were a perfect companion for riding the rails. The noise cancellation was good enough to filter most of the rail and station noise for all but the most extreme cases, such as JR Shinjuku platforms with multiple busy train lines, and loud announcements that have gotten much louder since AirPods Pro arrived as more and more people use…noise cancelling earphones. JR East has compensated by cranking train announcement volumes everywhere but especially so for platforms.

There is also the COVID effect which mandates partially open train car windows for COVID killing fresh air circulation. Not all windows are opened and only a bit, 10 cm or so, usually one window on each side between the doors. But even that little opening is extremely loud when a train goes underground or through underpasses. Older cars that run on the Tokyu Ikegami line are also not soundproofed like the modern Yamanote E235 trains. COVID era train commuting is a very challenging sound environment for AirPods Pro.

AirPods Pro 2: the best AirPods for COVID era train commuting
I’m happy to report that AirPods Pro 2 are a great improvement over the original AirPods Pro for rush hour train commuting in the COVID era. Here is my quick AirPods Pro 2 take from riding the rails everyday:

Audio Performance
With so many AirPods Pro 2 reviews out there, there is not much to add except to say the audio performance enhancement is as real as they say, the soundscape experience is much more immersive. My first impression grows stronger every day: if you like Dolby Atmos spatial audio mixes, these are the AirPods to have.

Noise cancellation
Apple’s claim of 2x noise cancellation over AirPods Pro 1st generation sounds about right. Switch point clatter, underpass roar, tunnel transit with open windows, extra loud platform announcements and more, are quiet but discernible background sounds instead of music killing sound tsunamis. You can even listen to music inside a pachinko parlor, the ultimate sound tsunami. Not that you would want to that, but with AirPods Pro 2 noise cancellation, you can.

Adaptive Transparency
Transparency mode is one of the killer features of AirPods Pro 1. The real time audio of transparency mode is on a level that other earphone makers have yet to match. How do you beat a hard to beat feature? By making it so natural you forget that you’re wearing them. 2nd generation transparency is much less tinny than the original. Everything sounds more natural, I’m not conscious of my voice like I was with the 1st generation, I feel like I’m having a normal conversation without earphones. Because it’s not flashy, the new ‘Adaptive’ feature is hard to pin down, but there’s a perfect way to test it. Stand outside a pachinko parlor near the entrance and wait for someone to go through the door. The resulting sound tsunami that always overwhelms 1st generation transparency is handled by adaptive transparency with ease, it doesn’t overwhelm your ears.

Touch control
AirPods was a huge improvement over EarPods in every way except one: the volume/playback control buttons. Listening to music in a packed train has special challenges. There isn’t always enough space to hold iPhone in one hand and a strap or pole in another. I always put my iPhone in my pack before getting on. Apple Watch isn’t a reliable solution either. Double clicking to bring up the player app and then rotate the knob to adjust volume is great in theory, but the reality is a pain point: not enough room to maneuver, buggy WatchOS that doesn’t change the volume, etc. AirPods Pro 2 touch controls are finally complete. They are easy to use and use discreetly. That is huge.

All aboard
AirPods Pro 1 were easily my favorite piece of Apple hardware these past few years. I got more day to day enjoyment than anything else. For me AirPod Pros 2 are a wonderful upgrade, not only for the new features and enhanced performance, but also for bringing the Dolby Atmos spatial audio experience into focus. I finally ‘get it’. We are still at the very beginning of the spatial audio era, but with AirPods Pro 2, I look forward to exploring new soundscapes yet to come. To enjoy a fully customized AirPods Pro 2 listening experience, make sure you dig into all the options, they make a big difference. Have fun.

Foreign VISA cards blocked for select Japanese mobile and online payments

Notice: this post will be updated with new developments, quick updates here


SoftBank Payments network chart

When foreign issue VISA cards in Wallet stopped working for some kinds of Apple Pay in-app purchases from Japanese merchants starting on August 5, the first people to howl in pain were Apple Pay PASMO users who suddenly couldn’t recharge the stored fare balance or renew commuter passes with their Chase Sapphire VISA cards. Chase Sapphire still codes for 3x travel points on PASMO you see and long time resident Suica users had migrated to PASMO when JR East and VISA shut down 3x travel points.

I did the usual duty of talking with Mobile Suica support, official line: there should be no problem, contact the card issuer. I then contacted Wells Fargo card services support, official line: there should be no problem with your VISA, contact the merchant. Entirely expected responses of course but I did confirm that Mobile Suica transaction attempts were not even showing on the Wells Fago system. They said it might be a ‘communications issue’.

I suspected a larger issue than just Apple Pay and an Android Suica user confirmed the same non-JP VISA problem with Google Pay Suica. I also alerted IT journalist Junya Suzuki who focuses on mobile payments. His first thought was something might be going on with the VISA Japan merchant acquirer side of the payment network. Maybe they were tightening online transaction security…or something else. He followed up with JR East PR and posted an article of his investigations that seem to place some responsibility on the JR East side. Everything clear as mud.

This past week a reader asked me if Japan was banning non-JP VISA cards across the board along with a screenshot of Universal Studios Japan advance ticket sales page with a red colored important notice on the top that said: “We apologize that currently Visa and Mastercard credit cards issued outside Japan are not available until further notice.” The DMM site is also not accepting foreign issue VISA and Mastercard.

Finally…proof that the problem is larger than just Mobile Suica and PASMO. I suspect there are other online sites with the same issue, we’re just not hearing about them. The USJ wording suggests that JTRWeb have their hands tied ‘until further notice’ and echos what JR East PR told Suzuki san about the non-JP VISA recharge problem being beyond their immediate control. Something seems to be happening with the VISA acquirer and Mastercard acquirer sides but in different highly selective ways. For example why does Apple Pay Suica work with foreign issue Mastercard and AMEX but not VISA, or why does foreign issue VISA work for Apple Pay in-app purchases with Japanese apps like Starbucks, but not in-app purchase with JR East for Suica recharge?

The impact of recent phishing attacks
It’s important to understand the effect of major phishing attacks that hit docomo, Line Pay, PayPay and other QR code payment services in late 2020, and JR East online services (Mobile Suica, JRE POINT, Eki-Net and VIEW card) in early 2022. Responses to phishing attacks has been slow, varied and sometimes vague. Companies like to say they value customer security but are short sharing details that outline exactly what they’re doing about it.

Docomo quickly suspended, then killed off, their problematic docomo koza e-paymnet service. Japanese credit card issuers responded by upgrading to EMV 3-D Secure v2 for browser and mobile app payments (edit: EMV 3-D Secure is the EMV e-commerce browser and app authentication spec for all members but card brands use their own naming) and are due to phase out 3-D Secure v1 by October 2022.

JR East has upgraded Suica App to 3-D Secure v2 for in-house credit card purchases and JRE POINT to make it more secure, but seemly little else. Scratch under the surface however and you’ll notice unannounced recharge security blocks with Apple Pay. There are also new limits for certain Japanese issue cards registered in Suica App. Recharge with Revolut VISA for example is now limited to 3,000 JPY per day despite the fact that Suica App uses 3-D Secure v2. Clear as mud…again.

Which brings up to the most important point of the whole problem: why is the VISA payment network not accepting foreign issue cards for Apple Pay Suica and Google Pay Suica recharge when those digital wallets offer the highest levels of secure online transactions out there? A bumpy 3-D Secure v2 transition might explain what’s happening with some online sites that have not been updated for the newer protocol, but the transition has been going on for a while now and the USJ site almost certainly uses EMV 3-D Secure v2. And it doesn’t explain what’s happening with Apple Pay Suica/PASMO and Google Pay Suica (Osaifu Keitai) which have nothing to do with EMV 3-D Secure.

The Apple Pay difference
Apple Pay adds a device specific secure element + bio-authorization security with built in tokenization. Apple Pay takes care of all complex tokenization/authorization stuff on their backend. Neither user nor merchant have to deal with 3-D Secure because Apple Pay has its own tokenization that ‘just works’. And because Apple Pay comes with the extra security and guarantees that Apple provides to issuers and merchants, once a card is added to Apple Wallet, it is cleared for all things Apple Pay (ditto for Google Pay). This is why a plastic contactless card that doesn’t work on TfL open loop transit gates works when it is added to Apple Wallet. It’s the Apple Pay difference.

So we circle back to foreign issue VISA again. Why are cards cleared for Apple Pay, cards that worked fine until August 5, suddenly not working? Is JR East shutting down recharge for foreign issue cards like Hong Kong Octopus and China T-Union do without telling us? So far JR East support says that all credit and debit cards that support Apple Pay in-app purchase are good to go. They certainly want inbound visitors to use Suica. What little evidence we have so far points to a change on the VISA side. Everybody else seems to be doing what they always do and haven’t changed anything.

VISA has a history of not playing nice with Japanese stored value cards on mobile. JP issue VISA cards didn’t work for Apple Pay in-app purchases and Suica recharge until last year, it took VISA 5 years to ‘resolve’ that issue. VISA cards still do not work with Mobile WAON and Mobile nanaco on Android and Apple Pay, they likely never will. My take is that VISA is happy with people buying things with VISA, they are certainly happy with people borrowing money with VISA, but they are not happy with people using VISA to move money into stored value prepaid cards for making payments, earning points, etc., that are not VISA.

Who knows? VISA has played hardball in the Japanese market before, maybe they are doing so again. Perhaps they refuse to be an ATM-like recharge backend for Japanese e-money cards unless they also get ATM-like lending rate surcharges, or maybe they want to promote open loop VISA Touch and Stera Transit at the expense Mobile Suica market and mindshare. You get the picture.

Junya Suzuki thinks VISA acquirers are coming under pressure from potential money laundering risks. I think people have the right to move their money where they want to, after all we’re only talking a max Suica balance of ¥20,000 here. Whatever the reason let’s hope it is fixed soon, though I have learned over the years that card brand payment issues are never simple. Time will tell. At the very least I think we can say this is just another skirmish in the ongoing digital payment turf wars.

iOS 16 Apple Pay and Wallet Fine Print Features

iOS 16 doesn’t have many big new flashy features. There is the Dynamic Island for iPhone 14 Pro, which I would love to have but I’m holding on to my iPhone 13 for another year…or two. Fortunately there are plenty of nice refinements for the rest of us without the latest greatest iPhone hardware, Apple Pay and Wallet are no exception. The full list is on the New features available with iOS 16 page. As usual the iOS 16 and watchOS 9 pages for each country are edited to reflect available, or coming soon, “Key Features and Enhancements” for the region balanced against the full spec USA feature set.

An interesting thing about iOS 16 Apple Pay and Wallet is that not all the listed features apply to regular users…at least not at first. Some are behind the scenes stuff for merchants and developers that will take time to land in our Apple Pay Wallet as features we can use. Let’s take a quick look by breaking down the categories.

1) General improvements (for everybody)
Quick access menu: a handy new shortcut menu for all Wallet cards and passes via tapping the More button. The menu varies according to the card feature set. Transit cards like Suica have the most, payment cards without notifications (all Japanese issue payments cards) have the least. It’s a nice tweak most useful as a fast way to toggle individual card notifications on and off. Zollotech posted a video that covers quick access menus for Apple Card and Apple Cash along with an overview of iOS 16 Apple Pay and Wallet option settings.

Apple Pay Order Tracking: announced at WWDC22, this new Wallet button sitting next to the ‘Add’ button seems like a no-brainer: when I order something with Apple Pay I get automatic tracking…nice but I wonder how it will play out. Apple Store app for example already has robust tracking and accepts Apple Pay, so do a lot of other apps. Will they remove the function from their app, offer choice between in-app or Wallet order tracking, or something else? Either way it will be a while before we see merchant updates.

2) Digital key features (for most markets): iOS 15 was the Apple Pay and Wallet upgrade that set the course for the next few years with keys and ID. The iOS 16 improvements are about making adding a key and family sharing easy. Hotel keys are now sharable like car and home keys, gotta let the kids have access and all…though I suspect office keys remain on the un-sharable list.

Key sharing (coming with an update later this year): in addition to Messages and Mail, 3rd party messaging apps such as What’s App will support key sharing. In Japan the only 3rd party messaging app that matters is Line. iOS 16 looks to be the breakout year for keys in Wallet.

Add keys from Safari: more important that it might seem at first, there are plenty of uses for loading a key into Wallet from a time sensitive Safari web page link instead of the usual time wasting mess of downloading an app, creating an account, making a reservation, etc. You know the drill. Digital key issue remains a complex thing that usually requires an app with an account to securely issue a mobile key remotely with set limitations (time, area, etc.). Hopefully adding keys in Safari gives developers easier service options, but connecting identity with access remains a challenge.

It’s important to note that issuing digital keys is only one step of the complex process that allows guests to bypass the front desk. Apple’s announcement certainly does not spell the end of the hotel app as we know it…

It’s a big step toward streamlining a process that has, until this point, prevented many guests from using their phone as a digital room key. But, Wallet only solves one segment of the end-to-end operation required to get a guest checked in and room access issued. The bigger issue is connecting identity with access, which requires many more steps beyond issuing a key.

How Apple’s Newest Features Will Affect Hotel Check-in

The solution to this is the new iOS 16 ID in Wallet features for apps in the next section.

Multi-stay hotel keys: if you stay in the same hotel chain on your trip that already supports Wallet hotel keys, you might have the opportunity to use this feature where you load one hotel key into Wallet that works across all your reservations. Like order tracking I think this one will take time for the major hotel chains to get onboard, and of course the devil is in the check-in/activation details.

Easy device migration for keys: I assume this refers to the Previous Cards Wallet category that came with iOS 15. The iOS 16 features page text blurb suggests a possible UI tweak, but I don’t have any key to test. We’ll have to wait and see.

3) ID in Wallet features (USA only): the next big step for ID in Wallet after getting them out the door is app support. This is where digital ID moves beyond airport TSA security checks and becomes really useful.

ID cards presented in apps and Verify your identity in apps sound exactly the same so you have to read the fine print carefully. ID cards in apps describes 2 specific pieces of information: identification and age, validated by Face/Touch ID. Taking a wild guess, there are plenty of account registrations that only need to confirm your identity and age as part of a signup process. Digital ID can vastly simplify the process.

Verify identity in apps describes ‘verified information’, i.e. more than just ‘I am this person, I am xx years old’. The iOS 16 pages shows a car rental app confirming a user’s driver license status and driving privileges. This has a lot more use (and abuse) potential. The hotel app and key issue verification problem mentioned earlier is exactly what digital ID in apps can help solve. MaaS apps are another example where verification is essential for offering special discounts for seniors, locals, inbound visitors, etc. Reliable, secure and universal digital ID would solve a lot of service problems, but privacy, how does the app use digital ID information, how long is it stored, etc., is always a concern.

Apple Pay features for merchants and developers: It’s a little strange that Apple is listing Merchant tokens and Multiple merchant support on the feature page. These are backend additions to PassKit and it will take time for merchants and the developers they employ to implement them. Both of these expand the Apple Pay experience. For me merchant tokens is the more powerful feature, one that enable reoccurring and auto-reload payments. It could be a boon for subscription services and much easier auto-recharge in apps and transit cards like Suica and PASMO. Auto-recharge is one of my favorite Apple Pay Suica features and it would be great if JR East freed it from the shackles of Suica App and View Card and added Apple Pay auto-recharge.

4) Apple Pay Services (for the USA): aka longtime USA only services: Apple Cash and Apple Card with the new addition of Apple Pay Later…coming later this year. All of these fall squarely in heavily regulated banking services, so don’t expect them to expand beyond the USA any time soon. The iOS 15.5-ish rebranding of iTunes Pass into Apple Account card, now with Wallet reload in iOS 16, should expand more quickly.

As with all recent iOS releases, the fun features comes later on in the life-cycle. I’ll update this post as with new information as the iOS 16 Apple Pay and Wallet story unfolds. Until then have a happy cashless, er, you know what I mean.