iOS 13 and the Transition to Global NFC

Crowd Cast president Takashi Hoshikawa updated his Japan Cashless map introduced back in January, the cacophony of QR Code payment platforms continues to grow. Just like any gold rush, QR will crash and burn at some point. Big players will gobble up the smaller ones and things will settle down.

But something else is going on. There’s a small but important difference, so small that Takashi Hoshikawa is not aware of it: he labeled the FeliCa section in the upper left corner as NFC.

This is the result of using Apple Pay on a global NFC iPhone where all the necessary hardware and software is seamlessly unified. The old plastic card mentality of different walled off technologies: contactless credit card (EMV), transit card (FeliCa, MIFARE), ID card (ISO 7816), NFC A/B or F, etc. slips away and becomes one seamless NFC Wallet in the mind. This mindset is also on display in SearchMan co-founder Naoki Shibata’s recent article on Rakuten Pay Suica: no mention of FeliCa anymore, it’s just one NFC thing.

This is an important and natural, but quiet progression that will accelerate with the enhanced NFC support in iOS 13 and expansion of new services like Apple Pay Octopus. iOS 13 Apple Pay Wallet will set the standard for global NFC that just works, a standard that Google Pay will struggle to match because of Android hardware fragmentation.

Players that leverage the advantages of global NFC and offer new services based on them, like JR East (Inbound Apple Pay Suica), and Mastercard (NFC switching dual mode bank card services) will gain, while companies that stick with the old ‘one thing’ contactless plastic card mentality, like Visa, will lose. It’s that simple.

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myki transit card expanding to Apple Pay

The Open Loop lovin’ NFC Times (paywall) reports that with the successful launch of myki on Google Pay, Public Transport Victoria (PVT) has allocated 1 million AUD to expand the virtual myki transit card to other digital wallet platforms, like Apple Pay and Samsung Pay.

Anyone up for taking bets on who gets it first?

UPDATE: It looks like Apple Pay is the winner when iOS 13 ships this fall. iOS 13 will be bringing Apple Pay Octopus transit support to Hong Kong as well.

HCE Secure Element in the Cloud is pie in the sky

Stefan Heaton’s blog piece “The reason Mobile myki isn’t available on iPhone… yet” is all the proof you need that Google inspired endless nonsense with Android Pay HCE support. This was shortly after the NFC “secure element” wars were over, with embedded Secure Element (eSE) on SIM cards losing out to eSE on smartphone chips. A secure element in the cloud approach seemed like it would solve everything, except that it didn’t.

myki is MIFARE which has never been compatible with HCE. Neither is FeliCa, which Google Pay users outside Japan assumed would work for Suica until they found out HCE-F was dead in the water and lost their shit.

What nobody has said, and I think it’s worth pointing out, is that the Android Pay to Google Pay shift was also a break with HCE and Google providing, or pretending to provide, a secure element strategy for all Android licensees. Instead, Google is focused on Pixel and their own eSE, all other Android licensees and manufacturers be dammed and left to find their own solutions. I guarantee you that, in time, Google will be doing most, if not all, of the same security hoops that Apple does now, for Google Pay card emulation (not host card emulation) for Google Pixel platform eSE access.

So yes, Apple does limit NFC Secure Element (implemented in the A Series Secure Enclave) access with PassKit NFC certificates. But Apple Pay MIFARE is real MIFARE, and Apple Pay FeliCa is real FeliCa. Public Transport Victoria (PTV) can apply for a myki card PassKit NFC certificate just like any developer. And for goodness sake Stefan, stop writing sentences that confuse Express Transit payment cards (EMV credit/debit cards) with regular Express Transit cards (FeliCa, MIFARE, PBOC). Suica is not a credit card and emulating EMV at a transit gate doesn’t automatically make a credit card into a Apple Pay Suica transit card, not by a long shot. If your aim is promoting open loop over closed loop, that’s one thing. Either way, your LinkedIn blog post is not doing your LinkedIn resume any favor.

UPDATE: Yep, myki is coming to Apple Pay, nothing to do at all with HCE support.

Tweet of the day: I want my Oyster

Reports of the Apple Pay EMV Express Transit option coming to TfL in ‘coming months’ notwithstanding, it does nothing for the many TfL users who need to use Oyster. Oyster card on Apple Pay and Google Pay is kinda like Brexit, endlessly discussed but never decided. TfL would like to get rid of Oyster altogether, I imagine the banks like it that way. Hoping that EMV will evolve and fix things is wishful thinking. Either way a decision has to be made at some point about native Oyster on digital.

Singapore TransitLink Goes EMV

Japanese media reports that Singapore TransitLink has gone all in with EMV contactless for transit with the SimpleGo program starting today, April 4. Mastercard is the first credit/debit card approved for the program with Visa to follow later this year. Using bank cards for transit is what Transit for London (TfL) has been doing for years with other transit systems such as Taiwan MTR adding support recently.

The Japanese report also mentions that EMV contactless cards loaded in Apple Pay/Google Pay/Samsung Pay etc. will work but judging from the Apple Pay experiences during the long beta test period, it is slow and not as reliable as EZ-Link transit cards.

There is no mention of the native EZ-Link transit card being hosted on digital wallets. I suspect that Singapore’s decision in 2009 to dump FeliCa for their own CEPAS technology could make that difficult as CEPAS use is limited to Singapore, and there is no business plan attached to sell the technology in other markets which FeliCa (Sony) or MiFare (NXP) do.