Waiting for iOS 13 Apple Pay Octopus

With the rollout of Apple Pay Octopus approaching the contents of this post has been consolidated into More Apple Pay Octopus Details. Instead of separate posts new information and developments will updated there.

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Apple Pay Octopus Details and Launch

With the Apple Pay Octopus rollout getting close I am consolidating new information and developments here, launch update at the bottom

A Hong Kong reader steered me to the source used in the previous screenshot post, there is quite a lot of detail from this September 2 post on the Lihkg.com site. Apple Pay Octopus device specs listed there are in line with expectations, an exact match with Apple Pay Suica:

A machine translation of the Chinese suggests:

  • Plastic card transfer and direct virtual Octopus card creation in Wallet supported, but unlike Suica Octopus plastic card deposits are not added to the balance when transferred to iPhone. The initial required balance for creating a virtual Octopus card is HK $100 with $50 as a deposit, shown in the screenshot. The Octopus deposit serves as emergency transit fare in case the Octopus balance is zero.
  • Service fees for Apple Pay Wallet Recharge are unclear. There are service fees on Samsung Smart Octopus for Samsung Pay Wallet recharge with Mastercard and Visa cards.

I get the feeling that some of these details might be different for the official Apple Pay Octopus rollout, we shall see. The current OCL schedule will almost certainly be updated with the Apple Pay Octopus release.

The post also says that, ‘most of the original’ transferable services of plastic Octopus are supported on the virtual version such as Automatic Add Value Service (AAVS), using Octopus for building access, etc., the same as Samsung Smart Octopus where some services are not transferred automatically from plastic Octopus, such as MTR Park and Ride, and need to be registered manually to virtual cards.

Other screenshots from the same site show Wallet Recharge apparently limited to China UnionPay (CUP) branded cards for the beta test period but should open up with the official release. A new beta test version of the iOS Octopus app (v6) and creation of Adult and Elder Apple Pay Octopus cards is also shown.

All in all it is clear that testing is far along, remember that this all started back in December. Apple Pay Octopus is ready for the iOS 13 rollout. Official service details from Octopus Cards Limited and Apple should be coming on, or shortly after the September 10 Apple Event. iOS 13 will be released on September 19.



UPDATE: Apple Pay Octopus Launch Day

The iPhone 11 Apple Event did not mention iOS 13 at all. Perhaps the simultaneous iOS 13 and iOS 13.1 beta release was unprecedented and too awkward to fit in the keynote. There was more riding on iOS 13.1 than people realized: highly anticipated items like Apple Tag were not mentioned even though there is plenty of evidence of it all over iOS 13.

The same is true for Apple Pay Octopus. The Apple Pay Wallet blurb has this transit card reference when the Region setting is Hong Kong: “Add credit, debit and travel cards to Apple Pay to make secure purchases and to use public transport”, both in the latest iOS 13.1 beta 3 and the iOS 13 golden master. This means everything is a go from iOS 13. Octopus Cards Limited (OCL) already announced “Octopus coming soon to iPhone and Apple Watch”on July 11 promising it “later this year.” We have some dates to consider:

  • September 19 iOS 13 release
  • September 25 Apple Pay Octopus release

There’s a small chance of an Apple Pay Octopus start announcement from OCL on September 19 iOS 13 release day, which is September 20 in Hong Kong. The actual start date will likely be offset a few days because there is huge pent up demand for Apple Pay Octopus. Apple and OCL would be wise giving their online system and support teams enough breathing space after the iOS 13 release weekend to avoid an Apple Pay Suica launch like meltdown.

In this scenario September 25 local Hong Kong time looks like the best target launch date for Apple Pay Octopus.

A press release from Apple would be nice but I’m not holding my breath. The days of announcements for transit additions to Apple Pay may be over. If the Apple Pay HOP service launch earlier this year is any indication, OCL should be lining up local Hong Kong media beforehand to cover startup day.

Keep an eye out for updates to the Hong Kong Apple Pay web page, it will certainly get the same Apple Pay Octopus artwork featured on the Octopus Cards Limited site at some point, and a graphic similar to the Japanese Apple Pay page outlining the different device support configurations for transit (Octopus: iPhone 8 and later) and payments (Octopus: iPhone 8 and later, or credit/debit bank cards: iPhone 6 and later). The Hong Kong Apple Pay NFC use device profile is very unique, there is nothing quite like it anywhere else.

UPDATE 2: Some readers have wondered if a later, as in iOS 13.1 later, launch date makes more sense in connection with a rumored October event. Anybody’s guess is as good as mine but there is no technical reason to wait. From the software side Apple Pay Octopus is ready to fly with iOS 13. It’s all up to OCL to push it out of the nest.

UPDATE 3: BTW Mobile Suica has a ‘special maintenance’ scheduled for early September 25 0:00~ 4:00, all recharge functions and credit card registration will be offline. Of course this means that most Apple Pay Suica functions will be offline too. Does Apple need to take some Apple Pay functions in Asia offline for bit? It’s probably nothing, but the midweek special maintenance date is odd and…..interesting.

Multifunction cards and iOS 13 Apple Pay Wallet

Leaks continue as Apple Event Day (September 10) and the iOS 13 release date (September 19) approach. The latest screenshot shows an Octopus Card Limited (OCL) co-brand multifunction credit card.

Octopus multifunction cards are similar to JR East View + Suica cards that combine credit and transit card functions with auto-recharge in one plastic package. When loading multifunction cards into Apple Pay only the credit portion is added. The functionality of the transit card is preserved instead of killing the plastic card altogether, which is the case when regular Octopus or Suica plastic transit cards are added to Apple Pay, a one way trip.

This ‘only adding the credit card to Apple Pay’ feature allows users to migrate back to the plastic combo transit card at any time. These cards are expensive to make and maintain, and card issuers want the full functionality of the card to be preserved. For this reason I doubt the ability to read multifunction cards into Apple Pay will ever happen. It’s far easier to only add the credit card portion and leave the plastic card untouched. The user can easily create a virtual transit card directly in iOS 13 Wallet and link it to the credit card for auto-recharge with the Octopus App or Suica App.

It’s only natural that Octopus multifunction cards join the parent Octopus transit card on iOS 13 Wallet to make one big happy Hong Kong Apple Pay family with multiple Express Transit Card (FeliCa and EMV) goodness. I sincerely hope the EMV Express Transit support shown in the screenshot does not mean that super slow EMV Contactless will be bolted onto MTR transit gates any time soon.

At any rate there should be some other Apple Pay goodies along with the official Apple mention of Apple Pay Octopus on September 10. Enjoy the show.

Update: a Hong Kong reader reached out to inform me that Octopus co-branded credit cards have been available on Apple Pay since the service started in Hong Kong. It’s nothing new. However, the multifunction angle is a new wrinkle when adding the Octopus co-branded cards to iOS 13 Apple Pay Wallet. Hong Kong iPhone users with multifunction Octopus cards will have to create a new Octopus transit card for Wallet use. OCL will undoubtedly update Octopus App with more auto-recharge options that relink the cards in Apple Pay Wallet.

Update 2: more Apple Pay Octopus service details, screenshots and new in development version of Octopus app

Ride the Rails with Apple Pay Suica and Earn JRE POINT

The enhanced NFC functions of iOS 13 could not have come at a better time for the Japanese market. The great 10% consumption tax cashless experiment begins October 1 when the tax hike becomes effective and the Japanese government starts giving 2%~5% refunds for cashless payments via established card point systems. The ‘My Number‘ Japanese Individual Number card will be a centerpiece for getting those point rebates and the Japanese government has already announced iOS 13 support for My Number card. The whole rebate/refund thing is clear as mud but exciting too. Suica is listed as one of the many e-money cards eligible for consumption tax refunds/rebates. Suica consumption tax point refunds will be delivered via JRE POINT.

JR East added to the excitement today with the announcement that starting October 1 Suica users can earn JRE POINT simply by riding the rails. Mobile Suica transit users (Apple Pay Suica, Google Pay Suica, Osaifu Keitai Suica) earn 1 JRE POINT per 50 yen of IC transit fare, plastic Suica cards earn 1 JRE POINT per 200 yen of IC transit fare.

That’s a huge incentive to drive transit users from plastic Suica to Mobile Suica. The same JRE POINT rates apply to Green Car Seat purchases. And get this, only Mobile Suica Commuter Plan purchases and renewals are eligible for JRE POINT with 1 JRE POINT per 50 yen of the purchase/renewal. This is a sweet deal if your company sponsors your commuter pass. They give you the money, you get the points. Ugh, now I have to hold off renewing my Apple Pay Suica Commute Plan until October 1 but the points are worth going without my commute plan for a few days. JR East’s big push for Mobile Suica over plastic is remarkable and will become a shove when the next generation ‘Super Suica’ format arrives in April 2021.

To earn points the Suica card must be registered to a JRE POINT account. The JRE POINT account setup process has gotten a little more streamlined, and the iOS JRE POINT App a little less clunky over the past year. Mobile Suica and JRE POINT systems are now dynamically linked so you don’t need to worry if the Apple Pay Suica card ID number changes.

Today’s announcement only applies to regular train travel but JR East will be adding a lot more in 2020~2021 as the Super Suica start date approaches: JRE POINT for Touch and Go Shinkansen travel starts with the new JR East eTicket system in April 2020, Round trip fixed travel route coupon-like JRE POINT is due December 2020. And finally, with Super Suica in place, the regular express train/Shinkansen ‘EkiNet‘ ticketing and point system will be rolled into the JRE POINT system. Travelers can then earn and use JRE POINT to purchase regular express train and Shinkansen eTickets and upgrade seats. It will be Apple Pay Super Suica eTicket bliss.

Bug Bounties, Public Betas and Risk Management

I love Paul Jorgensen’s blog and his unique take on cyber security issues. It is his chosen profession and he was one of the very few to notice and take interest in the August 2017 Google BGP leak that brought down Apple Pay Suica services and major parts of the Japanese internet. He was also one of the few to blog about China Telecom spoofing the BGP protocol to poison internet routes to suck up massive amounts of American and Canadian internet traffic for intelligence analysis.

In his post today Paul quotes Katie Moussouris on bug bounties and risk management. Specifically, relying on public bug bounty programs that just create the “appearance of diligence”:

“This is not appropriate risk management. This is not getting better when it comes to security vulnerability management..

A lot of the patterns [have] not actually shifted that much from where we were when I started out professionally 20 years ago as a penetration tester…

We’ve created a $170 billion industry, which, we’re really good at a few things, security not exactly being one of them. Marketing, definitely.”

As Paul points out, “bug bounties are a tool, but only one tool. And it’s a game, so people will look to take advantage.”

To draw a close analogy I would also say that the public beta approach that Apple now uses for iOS and macOS development is similar in that it just conjures the appearance of diligence, not diligence itself. It creates an atmosphere of reduced expectations, both on the engineering side and the user side: “it’s just a beta, we can still work out the bugs.” I wonder if we would be better off without a public beta, a better developer beta program with robust bug reporting tools might set a higher bar.

As others such as John Gruber have noted, iOS 13 has been one of the buggiest beta development cycles in recent memory. Perhaps I am being nostalgic, but I think when Steve Jobs still walked the halls in Cupertino, his drive to deliver an excellent shipping product, and fear of his wrath when things didn’t measure up, was due diligence that instilled the Apple development culture of that time.

People perceive quality even if they cannot put it into words, the old look and feel thing. As Moussouris points out, marketing is a poor substitute for diligence and quality. The risk of the current environment is that Apple ships software products that have lower expectations which no amount of marketing can make up for.